• Chord Inversions – The Key To Smooth Playing

    in Chords & Progressions

    chord inversions image

    Chord inversions are simply different ways to rearrange a chord.

    Some believe root position (how the chord is normally played with the keynote or title on the bottom) is not an official “inversion.” Others don’t make that distinction.

    I’m more with the latter perspective and prefer the easy definition: The number of notes in the chord equals the number of inversions (or ways you can play/rearrange the chord).

    Simply put, if the chord has 3 notes, it has 3 inversions or ways to rearrange it. If it has 4 notes, it has 4 inversions. 5 notes, 5 inversions.

    Chord Inversions – Root Position

    Take a C major chord. Here it is in root position.

    chord inversions root position

    Root position is what you get when the keynote or root of the chord is the lowest note.

    Remember my definition: The number of notes in the chord equals the number of ways you can play/rearrange the chord.

    3 notes – 3 ways.

    We’ve already covered the “default” root position so that leaves 2 inversions.

    Chord Inversions – First Inversion

    To get the next inversion, simply take whatever note is on the bottom and move it to the top.

    In our example, taking “C” from the bottom and moving it to the top leaves us with “E” on the bottom.

    chord inversions first inversion

    When you do this, the chord is in first inversion.

    First inversion is when the third of the chord is on the bottom

    If you look at C major, C is the root, E is the third (major third; see chord guide), and G is the fifth.

    When the third – or E in this case – is on the bottom, you’re playing it in first inversion.

    That means ALL of these examples are first inversions:

    chord inversions first inversion voicings

    chord inversions first inversion voicings

    chord inversions first inversion voicings

    *Some of these may obviously take two hands.

    But my point is, don’t confuse how you “voice” a chord with its inversion. You can double up on notes, place notes in the next octave, do whatever — as long as all the elements of the chord are there and the third is on the bottom. Third on bottom = first inversion.

    Chord Inversions – Second Inversion

    Take the third off the bottom and put it on top and you’re left with the fifth on the bottom. In this case, G.

    chord inversions second inversion

    Again, as long as the fifth is on the bottom, you can voice the chord however you like.

    chord inversions second inversion voicing

    chord inversions second inversion voicing

    Using Chord Inversions in Progressions

    Take the famous 4-chord progression discussed in yesterday’s post.

    In C major:

    C major (the 1):
    4-chord songs c major

    G major (the 5):
    4-chord songs G major

    A minor (the 6):
    4-chord songs a minor

    F major (the 4):
    4-chord songs f major

    As we don’t want to alter the actual chord progression (1-5-6-4), what if we only inverted the chords in our right hand?

    So we’d start by playing C major:

    C major (the 1):
    4-chord songs c major

    C is in our bass (left hand). Our right hand will start off in root position.

    Now the question is, which inversion of the G major chord would allow the smoothest transition?

    Here are your choices:

    G major (the 5):

    Root position (right hand)
    4-chord songs G major

    First inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs G major

    Second inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs G major

    Since G is a common note between both chords and is already being played as the highest note in the C major chord, the goal in this example is to leave it that way.

    That means, instead of having to move all 3 fingers on the right hand, one stays the same and we only have to move 2.

    First inversion gives us B on the bottom, which consequently puts G on top.

    So now, our progression looks like this:

    C major (the 1): Root Position
    4-chord songs c major

    G major (the 5): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs G major

    What about our third chord in the progression? The A minor.

    It doesn’t share any notes with G major but we can still choose the inversion closest to the chords we’re currently playing.

    A minor (the 6):

    Root position (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    First inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    Second inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    My personal preference would be first inversion.

    In the previous two chords, our melody stayed on G. By choosing the first inversion of A minor, we’re raising the melody only a whole step up to “A.”

    Choosing root position would have brought the melody up to “E.”

    Similar is true for second inversion.

    So here’s our progression so far:

    C major (the 1): Root Position
    4-chord songs c major

    G major (the 5): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs G major

    A minor (the 6): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs a minor

    For our last chord, we have two common notes: The “A” and the “C.”

    Only one inversion of the F major chord makes the most sense for our purposes right now. Can you figure out which one?

    F major (the 4):

    Root position (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    First inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    Second inversion (right hand)
    4-chord songs a minor

    If you see what I see, second inversion wins.

    Check out the transition between our A minor and F major chords:

    A minor (the 6): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs a minor

    F major (the 4): Second Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs a minor

    One-note difference on the right hand.

    Chord Inversions – Putting it all together

    C major (the 1): Root Position
    4-chord songs c major

    G major (the 5): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs G major

    A minor (the 6): First Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs a minor

    F major (the 4): Second Inversion Right hand
    4-chord songs a minor

    Until next time.

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    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    1 EMILIAN MIANI NEGREANU

    DEAR JERMAIN,I AM 90 YEARS OLD,,..ALL MY LIFE I WAS A PROFESSIONAL
    MUSICIAN(PIANIST,ARRANGER AND TEACHER…I AM A SONG-WRITER WITH SONGS PUBLISHED IN ROMANIA,GERMANY,AUSTRALIA ,ISRAEL AND CANADA..
    I AM GRADUATED IN CLASSICAL MUSIC FROM THE =ROYAL CONSERVATORY FROM BUCAREST,ROMANIA,AND I SWITCHED DURING THE YEARS TO DANCE
    MUSIC,POP AND JAZZ…I WAS TRAINED TO BE ABLE TO ARRANGE FR.COMBO
    TO =BIG-BAND=(4 TRUMPETS,4TROMBONES,5 SAX ,STRINGS AND BASS,GUITAR
    DRUMS AND PIANO….I PLAYED AS COCKTAIL-PIANIST ALL AROUND THE WORLD..I HAD A=REPERTOIR= OF MORE THAN 2.000 SONGS, PLAYING BY
    HEART ,STARTING WITH =CAFEE–CONCERT=,BROADWAY HITS,MUSIC FROM
    THE 30TH TIL THE 90TH,ITALIAN MUSIC,FRENCH,ISRAELY,RUSSIAN,INTERNA-
    TIONAL-MUSIC ETC.ETC.ETC…..WHY I WAS WRITING ALL THIS STORY ABOUT ME ??? NOT BECAUSE I AM =FULL OF ME== …BUT FOR GIVING YOU IDEAS
    FROM MY EXPERIENCE IN THIS PROFESSION WE CALL =SHOW-BUSINESS.
    I WAS TEACHING ALL MY LIFE…AND TO DAY AFTER SUCH A LONG TIME OF
    LOOKING TO YOUR MUSICAL EDUCATION-MATERIAL I STATED THAT YOU ARE A VERY GOOD TEACHER AND YOU KNOW MUSIC….BUT I REACHED THE
    CONCLUSION AFTER YEARS AND YEARS OF =MUSIC-EDUCATION= THAT ALL THE MAJORITY OF MY STUDENTS (DIFFERENT KNOWLEDGE OF MUSIC AND
    NOT LEARNING MUSIC TO BECOME =PRIFESSIONAL=MUSICIANS BUT AS
    LOVING MUSIC THEY WANTED TO DISCOVER HOW TO PLAY THE PIANO…
    AND THIS WAS THE MOMENT WHEN I =SWITCHED= ON THE SPOT FROM
    TEACHING THEM MAJOR CHORDS,MINOR CHORDS,UNISON MELODIC LINE,
    THIRDS,TRIADS, MAJOR SCALES,MINOR SCALES PENTATONIC SCALES,
    INTERVALS,CHROMATIC SCALES,THREE VOICES CHORDS,4 VOICES CHORDS
    5 VOICES CHORDS,SEVENTH,NINE,TEN,ELEVEN,THIRTEEN,INVERSIONS ,
    (MINOR AND MAJOR)FIVE-PLUS CHORDS,ETC ETC ETC……….THERE IS ==NO==
    END….YOU CAN STUDY ALL YOUR LIFE AND YOU DON’t REACH TO KNOW
    EVERYTHING……AND THEN ONE DAY I CHANGED COMPLETELY MY WAY OF TEACHING….I REALIZED THAT THEY THAT WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY THE PIANO AND TO BE HAPPY WITH THEM OR TO PLAY FOR FAMILY OR SOME
    FRIENDS ====NOBODY==== WANTED TO LISTEN TO YOU HOW YOU LEARN ED
    THE INVERSION OR TO PLAY FOR THEM SOME MAJOR OR MINOR SCALES..
    AND I DISCOVERED HOW MUCH PIANO OR ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD THEY
    KNEW AND I ARRANGED FOR EACH ONE THE SONGS THEY TOLD ME THAT THEY WOULD BE HAPPY TO PLAY IN CONFORMITY WITH THEIR BASIC–
    TECHNICAL POSSIBILITIES…AND SOMETIME =ONE–NOTE=IN THE BASS-LINE
    AND UNISON ON THE RIGHT HAND OF THE ASKED SONG…. FROM TIME TO TIME A===THIRD=== OR AN ==OCTAVE== FOR THE FINAL =BAR=(THE END)
    AND HONESTLY TO TELL YOU MY NUMBER OF =STUDENTS=GREW SO MUCH
    THAT I DIDN’T HAVE TIME TO TAKE NEW STUDENTS IN MY PACKAGE….
    AND SOMETHING ELSE HAPPENED IN MY ALL CAREER OF TEACHER…..
    FROM OVER APROXIMATELY 2.000 STUDENTS IHAD IN THE 50 OR 60 YEARS
    OF TEACHING ONLY 3(three) OR 4(four)BECAME PROFESSIONAL MUSICIANS MAKING A GOOD LIVING ……JERMAIN I CONGRATULATE YOU FOR WHAT YOU ARE DOING ,YOU”RE A GOOD TEACHER AND A NICE =PERSON= WISHING YOU ALL THE BEST…I AM RETIRED AND I AM LIVING IN MONTREAL,CANADA WITH MY WIFE ,SHE IS 82 AND I AM 90 ….MY NAME IS:EMILIAN-MIANI NEGREANU…
    AND MY EMAIL IS: mianimaja1@yahoo.com (EXCUSE MY BAD ENGLISH..
    HERE IN THE QUEBEC-PROVINCE WE SPEAK MORE FRENCH)…ALL THE BEST
    THE BEST…..

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