• The “What Key Am I In” Game 5

    in "What Key" Game

    Welcome to another edition of “What Key Am I In?”

    If you haven’t seen my past ones, click here to check them out.

    Ok… here we go:

    What major key am I in if I have these chords:

    A minor
    B minor
    E minor

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    ………………………….. Got it???
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    Answer:

    G major

    Explanation:

    Remember this chart from other posts?

    The first degree of a scale is associated with the major chord.

    The second degree of a scale is associated with the minor chord.

    The third degree of a scale is associated with the minor chord.

    The fourth degree of a scale is associated with the major chord.

    The fifth degree of a scale is associated with the major chord.

    The sixth degree of a scale is associated with the minor chord.

    The seventh degree of a scale is associated with the diminished chord.

    Recap:

    The 1st, 4th, 5th degrees are major chords.

    The 2nd, 3rd, and 6th degrees are minor chords.

    The 7th degree is a diminished chord.

    *Of course, when you play 4-toned chords, all these change to “seventh” chords (and the 5th tone becomes a “dominant seventh” chord and the 7th tone becomes a “half-diminished seventh” chord… but you didn’t need to know that for this lesson).

    There’s only one key that has A, B and E as minor chords… and that key is G major!

    Let’s take a look at the G major scale:

    G A B C D E F# G

    Now, if we apply the rules from above, we’ll be able to figure out which tones are minor:

    G – major chord
    A – minor chord
    B – minor chord
    C – major chord
    D – major chord
    E – minor chord
    F# – diminished chord

    So if you got this one right, good job! :-)

    Until next time —

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    Hi, I'm Jermaine Griggs, founder of this site. We teach people how to express themselves through the language of music. Just as you talk and listen freely, music can be enjoyed and played in the same way... if you know the rules of the "language!" I started this site at 17 years old in August 2000 and more than a decade later, we've helped literally millions of musicians along the way. Enjoy!

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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    { 3 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 STEVE

    Yes got it.It takes a while to get used to the mental gymnastics involved in figuring out scales but JG,s got me jumping through hoops.God bless you JG.

    Reply

    2 ITAGOTB

    This is a great exercise. Thanks JG!

    Reply

    3 TRUMUSIC1SOUL aka BRIAN

    COUNT ME IN I GOT IT!!! THESE LESSONS ARE REALLY PAYING OFF!!!

    Reply

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