• The “What Key Am I In” Game 3

    in "What Key" Game

    Welcome to another edition of “What Key Am I In?”

    If you haven’t seen my past ones, click here to check out game #1, or here for game #2. (It’ll really help, especially if you feel lost below).

    Since yesterday’s post was about minor keys, I want to keep it going by asking you, “What Minor Key Am I In?”

    In my minor key, I have these chords:

    Ab major 7
    Bb minor 7
    Db major 7

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    Answer:

    F minor

    Explanation:

    Remember that F is the relative minor of Ab major and they share the same exact key signature, notes in their scale, and chords that correspond to their scale tones.

    If you think in terms of the relative major keys, it’s a lot easier because you’ll probably be more familiar with them.

    So basically, ask yourself “what major key has an Abmaj7, Bbmin7, and Dbmaj7?” There’s only one and it’s Ab major.

    Then, from there, you just figure out the relative minor of Ab.

    That gives you F minor!

    Any questions? Post em below…

    Until next time!

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hi, I'm Jermaine Griggs, founder of this site. We teach people how to express themselves through the language of music. Just as you talk and listen freely, music can be enjoyed and played in the same way... if you know the rules of the "language!" I started this site at 17 years old in August 2000 and more than a decade later, we've helped literally millions of musicians along the way. Enjoy!

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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    { 6 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 BRIAN AKA TRUMUSIC1SOUL

    GREAT INFO..
    I GOT TO WORK ON THAT
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    I WAS WROOOOONNNGGGGGGGGG

    KEEP EM’ COMING, DANIELSON

    Reply

    2 BRIAN AKA TRUMUSIC1SOUL

    PUSH US TO THE LIMIT

    Reply

    3 MS

    Jermaine, I looked at the chords and immediately assumed it was in Ab; then I checked my table of chords in a Minor Scale to find which degree had a major chord followed by a minor chord, and followed by a third which is a major chord. This showed me that Ab major was the third degree of the scale, therefore the tonic was F. You already specified that it was a Minor Key exercise, so the answer was F minor. Then I checked the F Minor Scale, to verify. So you will notice that I actually used some of your explanation. Good re-inforcement exercise! Keep posting. Thanks.

    Reply

    4 STEVE

    Keep em coming Jermaine.A week ago or even 24 hours ago i would not have got the question right but i did.Definate progress due to Jermaine’s teaching.Thank you and God bless Jermaine.

    Reply

    5 Vater

    First of all, thanks for the free info on your site!
    My question is with this particular equation up above. If you have: AbM7, Bbm7, & DbM7, couldn’t you also be in the key of Bbm7 because of the rule of having Bbm7 as the I (tonic chord), the AbM7 as the seventh (Major), and the DbM7 as being the III chord (Major)?

    Reply

    6 giulio

    but no, because in a minor key the seventh is not a Major7 , it is a Dominant7.

    Reply

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