• Have You Learned These Six Chords Every Beginners Should Know?

    in Beginners,Chords & Progressions,Piano,Theory

    Post image for Have You Learned These Six Chords Every Beginners Should Know?

    There are six chords every beginner on the keyboard should know and I’ll show these chords in this lesson.

    Attention: This lesson is designed specifically for beginners. Therefore, if you’re not a beginner, you may need to check out this lesson on a dozen chords for intermediate players.

    As a beginner, there are six chords that are very important for you to learn and this is because of their common place in traditional harmony. Irrespective of your music orientation, style, taste, etc., you’ll definitely need these chords.

    These six chords are in two categories — primary chords and passing chords — and we’ll be starting out with primary chords. So, give me your undivided attention and take note that all the examples will be given in the key of C major.

    Category #1 – Primary Chords

    Before I show you the chords, let’s quickly refresh our minds on primary chords.

    A Short Note On Primary Chords

    For every key type (be it a major or minor key), primary chords are the chords that have the same quality with the key. For example, primary chords in the major key are major chords:

    Major chords in a major key = primary chords

    …while primary chords in the minor key are minor chords:

    Minor chords in a minor key = primary chords

    “Let’s Focus On The Major Key…”

    In the major key, primary chords are the major chords in the key and there are three of them:

    The 1-chord

    The 4-chord

    The 5-chord

    Lets go ahead and explore these primary chords.

    The 1-Chord

    The 1-chord is the chord of the first tone of the scale in the key you’re in. In the key of C major:

    …the first tone is C:

    So, the 1-chord is the C major triad:

    …which consists of three notes that are apart from each other by a third interval:

    C to E:

    …is a third interval.

    E to G:

    …is also a third interval.

    Here are three ways to play the 1-chord:

    The root position:

    The 1st inversion:

    The 2nd inversion:

    The 4-Chord

    In the key of C major:

    …the chord of the fourth tone of the scale (which is F):

    …is the 4-chord.

    Starting from F (which is the root) and using third intervals, we can derive the third and fifth tones:

    A third above F is A:

    …so we have A as the third tone.

    A third above A is C:

    …so we have C as the fifth tone.

    F, A, and C when played together produces the 4-chord — the F major triad:

    Here are three ways to play the 4-chord:

    The root position:

    The 1st inversion:

    The 2nd inversion:

    The 5-Chord

    Using third intervals, the 5-chord can be formed.  Starting from the fifth tone of the C major scale:

    ….which is G:

    …here are the rest of the chord tones:

    A third above G is B:

    …so we have B as the third tone.

    A third above B is D:

    …so we have D as the fifth tone.

    Altogether we have G, B, and D:

    …which is the G major triad or the 5-chord in the key of C major.

    Here are three ways to play the 5-chord:

    The root position:

    The 1st inversion:

    The 2nd inversion:

    Category #2 – Passing Chords

    It’s not safe to assume that everyone is already conversant with passing chords. Therefore, we’ll start out in this segment with quick insights on passing chords.

    “What Are Passing Chords?”

    A passing chord basically functions as the link between two scale tone chords. For example, using two of the primary chords we already learned (as a reference):

    The 1-chord:

    The 5-chord:

    …we can see how passing chords can be used to link up two scale tone chords.

    “Take A Closer Look…”

    The D dominant seventh chord:

    …can be used as a passing chord to link the 1-chord and the 5-chord:

    The 1-chord:

    The passing chord to the 5-chord:

    The 5 chord:

    The use of the passing chord to connect the 1-chord and 5-chord produced an interesting progression. The role of the passing chord is to create an anticipation for the 1-chord.

    Alright! Let’s see all the passing chords to the primary chords we covered in the previous segment.

    The Passing Chord To The 1-Chord

    The 1-chord is the C major triad:

    …and its passing chord is a fifth above its root.

    A fifth above the root of the C major triad (which is C):

    …is G:

    Consequently, the G dominant seventh chord:

    …is the passing chord to the 1-chord:

    “Here are The Four Known Ways To Play The Passing Chord…”

    G dominant seventh chord (root position):

    G dominant seventh chord (first inversion):

    G dominant seventh chord (second inversion):

    G dominant seventh chord (third inversion):

    The Passing Chord To The 4-Chord

    The passing chord to the 4-chord (which is the F major triad):

    …is the C dominant seventh chord:

    Attention: This is because C is a fifth above the root of the F major triad (aka – “the 4-chord).

    “Here are The Four Known Ways To Play The Passing Chord…”

    C dominant seventh chord (root position):

    C dominant seventh chord (first inversion):

    C dominant seventh chord (second inversion):

    C dominant seventh chord (third inversion):

    The Passing Chord To The 5-Chord

    The D dominant seventh chord:

    …is the passing chord to the 5-chord (which is the G major triad):

    …and this is because D is a fifth above the root of the G major triad (which is the 4-chord):

    G to D is a fifth:

    “Here are The Four Known Ways To Play The Passing Chord…”

    D dominant seventh chord (root position):

    D dominant seventh chord (first inversion):

    D dominant seventh chord (second inversion):

    D dominant seventh chord (third inversion):

    Final Words

    In this lesson, we’ve covered half-a-dozen chords that every beginner should know.

    I’m looking forward to sharing with you on how these primary and passing chords can be applied in the accompaniment of songs.

    Before then, go ahead and master these six chords and all the possible inversions they can be played in. Don’t forget to post your suggestion, question, and contribution in the comment box below.

    See you in the next lesson.

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as the head of education, music consultant, and chief content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with hundreds of thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




    songtutor600x314-4jpg

    gospelnewbanner3jpg

    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    1 Carolyn

    Thanks God bless you.

    Reply

    Leave a Comment

    Previous post:

    Next post: