• Who Else Is Interested In Learning About The Altered Extensions Of The Dominant Seventh Chord?

    in Chords & Progressions,Experienced players,General Music,Jazz music,Piano,Theory

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    In today’s lesson, we’ll be learning about the altered extensions of the dominant seventh chord.

    Dominant seventh chords have been an integral part of harmony for the past 500 years and believe it or not, they’ll still be applied for the next 1000 years – as long as tonality is relevant. That’s why every serious pianist must learn the diverse applications of the dominant seventh chord.

    Beyond the knowledge of dominant seventh chords, there’s need to learn extended dominant chords, which are bigger and complex dominant chords that advanced players use most of the time.

    If you invest the next 12 minutes or so, I’ll be exposing you to some of the essential body of rudiments you need to know about the altered extensions of the dominant seventh chord.

    A Quick Breakdown Of The Dominant Seventh Chord

    Let’s get started by defining the terms dominant, seventh, and chord.

    A Short Note On The Term “Dominant

    The term dominant is a technical name that music scholars associate with the fifth degree of the scale. In every key (whether major or minor), the fifth tone is referred to as the dominant.

    Submission: I may not tell you why this is so in this lesson, and that’s because I don’t want to drift from our focus.

    In the key of C major:

    …the fifth tone (which is G):

    …is the dominant.

    In a nutshell, the term dominant is synonymous with five or a fifth in music.

    A Short Note On The Term “Seventh

    The term seventh is used to quantify an interval or chord that encompasses seven scale degrees or seven letter names.

    In the key of C major:

    …an interval or chord that spans from C to B:

    …is quantified as a seventh.

    A Short Note On The Term “Chord

    A chord is a collection of three or more related notes (agreeable or not) sounded together.

    A chord is a product of the scale and intervallic relationship between notes. Three or more notes of the C major scale scale can be stacked together in third intervals to produce a chord.

    “Check It Out…”

    Picking C:

    …skipping D and picking E:

    …skipping F and picking G:

    …produces the C major triad:

    The C major triad consists of C, E, and G, which are related by the C major scale and third intervals.

    “What Is A Dominant Seventh Chord?”

    From what we’ve learned earlier in this segment, the dominant seventh chord can be defined as a collection of related notes (chord) established on the fifth degree in the key (dominant), that encompass seven degrees of the scale (seventh.)

    In the key of C major:

    …the dominant seventh chord can be established on the fifth degree of the scale (which is G):

    Using the pick-skip technique, other chord tones can be added in third intervals by picking G:

    …skipping A and picking B:

    …skipping C and picking D:

    …skipping E and picking F:

    Altogether, that’s the G dominant seventh chord:

    …a collection of related notes, founded on the fifth degree of the C major scale (G) and encompassing seven tones of the scale.

    “Check Out The Dominant Seventh Chord In All Twelve Keys…”

    C dominant seventh chord:

    Db dominant seventh chord:

    D dominant seventh chord:

    Eb dominant seventh chord:

    E dominant seventh chord:

    F dominant seventh chord:

    F# dominant seventh chord:

    G dominant seventh chord:

    Ab dominant seventh chord:

    A dominant seventh chord:

    Bb dominant seventh chord:

    B dominant seventh chord:

    Altered Extensions Of The Dominant Seventh Chord

    [This Section Will Be Available In A Few Hours! Thank You For Your Patience.]

    Take Me To The Next Lesson

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    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as the head of education, music consultant, and chief content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with hundreds of thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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