• The Application Of The Octave Transposition Technique In The Inversion Of Triads And Seventh Chords

    in Beginners,Chords & Progressions,General Music,Piano,Piano Exercises,Theory

    Post image for The Application Of The Octave Transposition Technique In The Inversion Of Triads And Seventh Chords

    In today’s lesson we’ll be applying the octave transposition technique in the inversion of triads and seventh chords.

    The inversion of chords is challenging to the average beginner out there. By my estimation, 73% of beginners find it difficult to learn and master the inversion of chords and this is because of its mental and technical demands.

    If you belong to this league of musicians, I have good news for you:

    There’s finally a smarter way to master the inversion of chords.

    In the next 15 minutes or so, I’ll be showing you a smarter approach to the inversion of chords using the octave transposition technique.

    A Review On The Octave Transposition Technique

    The term octave transposition consists of two words – octave and transposition. Due to the fact that we’ve already covered the term octave in a previous segment, we’ll just breakdown the term transposition before we continue.

    So, what is transposition?

    Transposition literally means a transfer of the position of an idea [be it a note, scale, interval, chord, chord progression, or song].

    The term octave transposition has to do with the transfer of a musical idea from its position to a higher or lower octave and here are common examples of octave transposition…

    • The Octave Transposition Of Notes
    • The Octave Transposition Of Scales
    • The Octave Transposition Of Chords

    “Here’s A Quick Explanation To Each Of Them…”

    The Octave Transposition Of Notes

    The octave transposition of any given note moves it from its position on the keyboard to a higher or lower octave. If the note E:

    …is given, octave transposition can either transfer it from its position:

    …to a higher position:

    “Or…”

    …from its position:

    …to a lower position:

    When the given note (which is E):

    …has either been transposed to a lower E:

    …or a higher E:

    …then octave transposition of the note has been applied.

    The Octave Transposition Of Scales

    A scale can be played on a position higher or lower than given, using the octave transposition concept. Let’s use the F natural minor scale:

    …as a reference. It is only through octave transposition that the F minor scale:

    …can either be transferred from its position to this position:

    “Or…”

    …from its position:

    …to this position:

    Hence, when the given scale (just like the F natural minor scale):

    …has been transferred from its position to either a lower:

    …or higher:

    …position, then octave transposition of the scale has been applied.

    The Octave Transposition Of Chords

    Chords can also be transferred from one position on the keyboard to another using the octave transposition concept. Given the G major triad:

    …it is through octave transposition that it can either be transferred from its position to this position:

    “Or…”

    …from its position:
    …to this position:

    It is the application of the concept of octave transposition that can transfer a given chord (which is the G major triad in this case):

    …to a lower octave:

    …or to a higher octave:

    “In A Nutshell…”

    The octave transposition technique can also be used to transfer intervals, chord progressions, and songs from one position on the keyboard to another.

    “What Is Chord Inversion?”

    Although there are two basic approaches to the inversion of a chord:

    …we’ll be focusing on the former – the keyboard style inversion.

    Inversion Of Triads

    A triad is a chord of three notes. There are four different triad qualities ranging from the major triad, to the minor triad, to the diminished triad, and the augmented triad that make up the “fantastic four.”

    When a triad is played exactly the same way it’s formed, it is said to be in root position. The following triads:

    The C major triad

    The F minor triad:

    The Bb augmented triad:

    The D diminished triad:

    …are root position triads.

    A root position triad consists of a root, third and fifth tone. In the root position triad, the root of the chord is the lowest pitch. Rearranging the order of the notes in a given triad in such a way that the third and fifth chord tones are the lowest pitches produces the inversion of that given chord.

    “Let’s Breakdown Chord Inversion Using The C Major Triad As A Reference…”

    First Inversion

    Rearranging the root position of the C major triad:

    …in such a way that E is the lowest note:

    …produces the first inversion of the C major triad:

    Second Inversion

    Rearranging the root position of the C major triad:

    …in such a way that G is the lowest note:

    …produces the second inversion of the C major triad:

    Let’s quickly talk about the inversion of seventh chords before we proceed.

    Inversion Of Seventh Chords

    A seventh chord is a chord that encompasses seven tones of a given scale.

    Although there are various seventh chord qualities, these five qualities are commonly used:

    A seventh chord played exactly the same way it’s formed, is said to be in root position. The following seventh chords:

    The Bb major seventh chord:

    The Eb minor seventh chord:

    The F dominant seventh chord:

    The C half-diminished triad:

    The D diminished triad:

    …are root position seventh chords.

    A root position seventh chord consists of a root, third, fifth and seventh tone. In a root position seventh chord, the root of the chord is the lowest pitch. Rearranging the order of the notes in a given seventh chord in such a way that the third, fifth and seventh chord tones are the lowest pitches, produces the inversion of that given seventh chord.

    “Let’s Breakdown Chord Inversion Using The G Dominant Seventh Chord As A Reference…”

    First Inversion

    Rearranging the root position of the G dominant seventh chord:

    …in such a way that B is the lowest note:

    …produces the first inversion of the G dominant seventh chord:

    Second Inversion

    Rearranging the root position of the G dominant seventh chord:

    …in such a way that D is the lowest note:

    …produces the second inversion of the G dominant seventh chord:

    Third Inversion

    Rearranging the root position of the G dominant seventh chord:

    …in such a way that F is the lowest note:

    …produces the third inversion of the G dominant seventh chord:

    Chord Inversion Using The Octave Transposition Technique

    The octave transposition technique is an important tool that can make the inversion of chords the easiest thing in the world for you to do.

    Given a triad or seventh chord you can invert it by applying the octave transposition technique, and I’ll be showing you step-by-step, how this is done.

    Inversion of Triads

    The root position of the C major triad:

    …has C:

    …as the lowest chord tone. The octave transposition of this C:

    …to its higher octave (which is C):

    …produces the first inversion of the C major triad:

    The first inversion of the C major triad:

    …has E:

    …as the lowest chord tone. The octave transposition of this E:

    …to its higher octave (which is E):

    …produces the second inversion of the C major triad:

    Inversion of Seventh Chords

    The root position of the D minor triad:

    …has D:

    …as the lowest chord tone. The octave transposition of this D:

    …to its higher octave (which is D):

    …produces the first inversion of the D minor seventh chord:

    The first inversion of the D minor seventh chord:

    …has F:

    …as the lowest chord tone. The octave transposition of this F:

    …to its higher octave (which is F):

    …produces the second inversion of the D minor seventh chord:

    The second inversion of the D minor seventh chord:

    …has A:

    …as the lowest chord tone. The octave transposition of this A:

    …to its higher octave (which is A):

    …produces the third inversion of the D minor seventh chord:

    Final Words

    The inversion of triads and seventh chords has never been this easy with the octave transposition technique.

    Right now, it’s incumbent on you to apply the octave transposition technique to the inversion of various qualities of triads and seventh chords.

    Thank you for your time!

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as the head of education, music consultant, and chief content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with hundreds of thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




    songtutor600x314-4jpg

    gospelnewbanner3jpg

    { 0 comments… add one now }

    Leave a Comment

    Previous post:

    Next post: