• Revealed: The Minor Chord Idea Transposition For ALL Musicians

    in Chords & Progressions,Experienced players,Gospel music,Jazz music,Piano,Theory,Transposing Keys

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    The minor chord idea transposition is a universal concept every musician must not be without.

    “Permit Me To Tell You Why…”

    Most music styles across classical and popular music have one thing in common and that is the concept of key and quality. You already know that the key of C major in Jazz is the same in classical music.

    Our focus in this lesson is on minor chords and the quality of being “minor” is associated with the minor key; which dates back to the tonal music of the 17th century.

    Attention: Any musical work (instrumental or song) that is played in a key (be it a major or minor key) is categorized as tonal music.

    For the past 400 years or so, a vast majority of our library songs and favorite instrumentals are under the tonal music category.

    The key of C major:

    …is universal and is used by classical and popular musicians alike and so is the quality of being “minor” (or major).

    So, as long as minor chords are used in your favorite music style, you can benefit from this lesson.

    The Concept Of Idea Transposition In The Major Key

    Before we define the concept of idea transposition in the major key, let’s talk about scale tone chords.

    There are seven scale tones in the major key. In the key of C major:

    …here are the scale tones:  C, D, E, F, G, A, and B.

    Each of these scale tones is unique and has its corresponding ideas. For example, the first tone (which is C):

    …has its corresponding scale, chord, progression, melodic lines, etc., which is different from that of the second tone (which is D):

    “Now, Back To The Concept Of Idea Transposition In The Major Key…”

    Idea transposition in the major key is concerned with the transposition of an idea (be it a note, scale, interval, chord, progression, etc.) from one scale tone in the major key to another.

    Attention: Transposition simply means the TRANSfer of POSITION.

    The transposition of an idea in the major key transfers its position from one scale tone in the major key to another.

    Chord-Based Idea Transposition For Minor Chords In The Major Key

    Idea transposition in the major key is chord based: works from minor chord to minor chord and from major chord to major chord.

    In this lesson, we’re focusing on how minor chord ideas can be transposed from one minor chord to another in the major key. BUT Before we get into learning how chord-based ideas can be transposed from one scale tone to another, let’s look at the scale tones in the major key that are associated with minor chords.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The “Official Guide To Piano Playing.” Click here for more information.

    “So, Where Are The Minor Chords In The Major Key?”

    There are seven unique chords in the major key and their roots are the tones of the major scale: seven of them.

    In the key of C major:

    The tones of the scale (which are C, D, E, F, G, A, and B) are the root notes of the scale tone chords in the key:

    The 1-chord (is the C major seventh chord):

    The 2-chord (is the D minor seventh chord):

    The 3-chord (is the E minor seventh chord):

    The 4-chord (is the F major seventh chord):

    The 5-chord (is the G major seventh chord):

    The 6-chord (is the A minor seventh chord):

    The 7-chord (is the B half-diminished seventh chord):

    Our focus in this segment is to determine the minor chords in the major key and they are as follows:

    The 2-chord (is the D minor seventh chord):

    The 3-chord (is the E minor seventh chord):

    The 6-chord (is the A minor seventh chord):

    Altogether, there are three minor chords in the major key: the 2-chord, 3-chord, and 6-chord.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The “Official Guide To Piano Playing.” Click here for more information.

    Minor Chord Idea Transposition In The Major Key

    There’s no limit to what can be transposed from one minor chord to another in the major key. However, we’ll be looking at the chord-based transposition of scales, chords/voicings, progressions, and melodic lines in the major key.

    Transposition Of Scales

    The relative minor key is established on the sixth tone of the scale. In the key of C major:

    …the relative minor key is established on the sixth tone of the scale and that’s A:

    Consequently, the key of A minor:

    …is the relative minor key to the key of C major:

    “The Traditional Scales Associated With The Key Of A Minor Can Be Transposed…”

    There are three traditional scales associated with the key of A minor:

    The A natural minor scale:

    The A harmonic minor scale:

    The A melodic minor scale:

    …which can be transposed from A (the sixth tone):

    …to D (the second tone):

    …to produce the following scales:

    The D natural minor scale:

    The D harmonic minor scale:

    The D melodic minor scale:

    …and also to E (the third tone):

    …to produce the following scales:

    The E natural minor scale:

    The E harmonic minor scale:

    The E melodic minor scale:

    “Scales Associated With The 2-Chord (The D Minor Chord) Can Be Transposed…”

    The following scales are associated with the 2-chord:

    The D Dorian scale:

    The D minor pentatonic scale:

    The D Dorian bebop scale:

    …can be transposed from D (the second tone):

    …to E (the third tone):

    …to produce the following scales:

    The E Dorian scale:

    The E minor pentatonic scale:

    The E Dorian bebop scale:

    …and also to A (the sixth tone):

    …to produce the following scales:

    The A Dorian scale:

    The A minor pentatonic scale:

    The A Dorian bebop scale:

    “So, What’s The Outcome…”

    The chord-based transposition of scales between the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th tones in the major key provides you with multiple scale options. In the key of C major:

    …you might not have the E Dorian scale:

    …in mind as a scale option for the E minor seventh chord:

    …and this is because the F#-note in the E Dorian scale is NOT a scale tone in the key of C major.

    It is the compatibility of the D Dorian scale:

    …with the D minor seventh chord:

    …that makes the use of the E Dorian scale over the E minor seventh chord an option.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The “Official Guide To Piano Playing.” Click here for more information.

    Transposition Of Progressions

    Chord progressions can be transposed from one scale tone to another in the major key. In chord-based idea transposition, minor chord ideas can be transposed between the 2-chord, the 3-chord, and the 6-chord.

    A 2-5-1 chord progression to the 6-chord:

    The 2-chord:

    The 5-chord:

    The 1-chord:

    …can be transposed to the 2-chord:

    The 2-chord:

    The 5-chord:

    The 1-chord:

    …and the 3-chord:

    The 2-chord:

    The 5-chord:

    The 1-chord:

    Chord progressions to the 2-chord or 3-chord can also be transposed to other scale tones in the major key.

    Transposition Of Melodic Lines

    Melodic lines like runs, licks, riffs, etc., can be transposed from one scale tone in the major key to another and this is chord based.

    Here’s How It Works…”

    Licks that are played over the 2-chord can be transposed to the 3-chord and the 6-chord.

    Licks that are compatible with the 3-chord can be transposed to the 2-chord and the 6-chord.

    Licks that are played over the 6-chord can be transposed to the 2-chord and the 3-chord.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The “Official Guide To Piano Playing.” Click here for more information.

    Final Words

    It’s my pleasure showing you how to move your minor chord ideas from one minor chord to another in the major key and I know that this lesson has opened your eyes to a lot of possibilities.

    In a subsequent lesson, we’ll cover the chord-based transposition of the major chord in the major key.

    Keep up the great work.

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as a music consultant and content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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