• Do You Want To Master All Major Triads? Do This Exercise

    in Beginners,Chords & Progressions,Piano

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    In this lesson, I’ll be showing you (step-by-step) how to master all major triads.

    Unlike diminished and augmented triads, major triads are so important that we can hardly do without them. This is because most of the songs we listen to are in the major key, and playing in the major key requires major triads.

    If you’re coming across the term major triad for the first time or maybe you’re not sure what it means, don’t worry. We’ll be getting started by refreshing our minds on the major triad.

    A Short Note On The Major Triad

    So, what is a major triad?

    According to Jermaine Griggs, “a major triad is produced when the first, third, and fifth tones of the major scale are played or heard together.”

    The major triad is basically a collection of three notes and these three notes are taken from the major scale. For example, the C major scale:

    …can be used to produce the major triad.

    “Here’s How It Works…”

    The first tone (which is C):

    …third tone (which is E):

    …and fifth tone (which is G):

    …when played together, produces the C major triad:

    Although there are so many ways to form the major triad, using the major scale in any key, a corresponding major triad can be formed when the first, third, and fifth tones are played or heard together.

    “Here Are All The Major Triads…”

    C major triad:

    Db major triad:

    D major triad:

    Eb major triad:

    E major triad:

    F major triad:

    Gb major triad:

    G major triad:

    Ab major triad:

    A major triad:

    Bb major triad:

    B major triad:

    Now that we’ve refreshed our minds on major triads, let’s go ahead and explore three warm-up exercises that would help you master it effortlessly.

    Attention: To learn more about chords, and other important concepts, I recommend that you get our 500+ page course, “The Official Guide To Piano Playing.” If you’re interested, click here for more information.

    Warm-Up Exercises On Mastering All Major Triads

    The exercises below will prove helpful in the mastery of major triads.

    “But That’s Not All…”

    You’ll also benefit a lot because the major triads are played in successions of a fourth. This means that the distance (aka – “interval”) between two successive major triads is a fourth.

    Also, the use of all the possible positions of the major triad — root position, first inversion, and second inversion — will improve your ability to move from one triad position to another (let’s say from root position to the first or second inversion.)

    Attention: Don’t forget to make these exercises a part of your daily warm-up routine.

    Let’s get started!

    Warm Up Exercise #1

    Instruction: There are twelve counts in this exercise and each of the chords given below should be played on each count. We’ll be starting out and ending on the root position of the C major triad.

    “Here You Are…”

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in root position).

    Count #2:

    …the F major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #3:

    …the Bb major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #4:

    …the Eb major triad (in root position).

    Count #5:

    …the Ab major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #6:

    …the Db major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #7:

    …the Gb major triad (in root position).

    Count #8:

    …the B major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #9:

    …the E major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #10:

    …the A major triad (in root position).

    Count #11:

    …the D major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #12:

    …the G major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in root position).

    Here’s The Exercise Again…”

    Count #1:

    Count #2:

    Count #3:

    Count #4:

    Count #5:

    Count #6:

    Count #7:

    Count #8:

    Count #9:

    Count #10:

    Count #11:

    Count #12:

    Count #1:

    Attention: To learn more about chords, and other important concepts, I recommend that you get our 500+ page course, “The Official Guide To Piano Playing.” If you’re interested, click here for more information.

    Warm Up Exercise #2

    Instruction: There are twelve counts in this exercise and each of the chords given below should be played on each count. We’ll be starting out and ending on the first inversion of the C major triad.

    “Here You Are…”

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #2:

    …the F major triad (in root position).

    Count #3:

    …the Bb major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #4:

    …the Eb major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #5:

    …the Ab major triad (in root position).

    Count #6:

    …the Db major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #7:

    …the Gb major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #8:

    …the B major triad (in root position).

    Count #9:

    …the E major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #10:

    …the A major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #11:

    …the D major triad (in root position).

    Count #12:

    …the G major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in first inversion).

    Here’s The Exercise Again…”
    Count #1:

    Count #2:

    Count #3:

    Count #4:

    Count #5:

    Count #6:

    Count #7:

    Count #8:

    Count #9:

    Count #10:

    Count #11:

    Count #12:

    Count #1:

    Attention: To learn more about chords, and other important concepts, I recommend that you get our 500+ page course, “The Official Guide To Piano Playing.” If you’re interested, click here for more information.

    Warm Up Exercise #3

    Instruction: There are twelve counts in this exercise and each of the chords given below should be played on each count. We’ll be starting out and ending on the second inversion of the C major triad.

    “Here You Are…”

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #2:

    …the F major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #3:

    …the Bb major triad (in root position).

    Count #4:

    …the Eb major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #5:

    …the Ab major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #6:

    …the Db major triad (in root position).

    Count #7:

    …the Gb major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #8:

    …the B major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #9:

    …the E major triad (in root position).

    Count #10:

    …the A major triad (in second inversion).

    Count #11:

    …the D major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #12:

    …the G major triad (in root position).

    Count #1:

    …the C major triad (in second inversion).

    Here’s The Exercise Again…”

    Count #1:

    Count #2:

    Count #3:

    Count #4:

    Count #5:

    Count #6:

    Count #7:

    Count #8:

    Count #9:

    Count #10:

    Count #11:

    …the D major triad (in first inversion).

    Count #12:

    Count #1:

    Attention: To learn more about chords, and other important concepts, I recommend that you get our 500+ page course, “The Official Guide To Piano Playing.” If you’re interested, click here for more information.

    Final Words

    I’m doubly sure you found this challenging if you’re absolutely a beginner, but don’t let the challenge overwhelm or discourage you.

    The goal of this lesson is still to help you master major triads and if you do these exercises daily, you’ll notice a remarkable improvement.

    Keep up the great work and see you in the next lesson.

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as a music consultant and content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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    { 3 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 Dennis Joyner

    Nice workout exercise, can’t wait to get started, thanks Hear and Play 😃

    Reply

    2 Raj

    I started this exercise today and I am facing one question.
    I play triads, always using my left hand; and I use my right hand for melody notes.
    Can you please suggest Left hand fingering for the triad in each count in all your 3 exercises, enabling easy switch from one count to the next.
    This will greatly facilitate my practicing your exercises.
    Thanks.
    Raj @ Bangalore

    Reply

    3 Raj Srinivas

    Jermaine or anyone else,
    I had asked for tips on Left hand fingering for practising all the major triad exercises. Pl. respond.
    Thanx.
    Raj

    Reply

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