• How To Transform Triads From Simple To Sophisticated Using Three Ingredients

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    I’ll be showing you three ingredients that can transform triads from simple to sophisticated in this lesson.

    Although there are so many occasions where a triad is appropriate, it’s also important to note that there are certain genres and styles of music where sophisticated chords are needed.

    So, I’ll be showing you three ingredients that will transform major and minor triads into sophisticated chords. But before we do so, let’s review triads.

    A Quick Review On Triads

    A triad is a collection of three related notes (agreeable or not) which may be played or heard together.

    The Major Triad

    Using the major scale, the major triad can be formed when the first, third, and fifth tones of the major scale are played or heard together.

    Using the C major scale:

    …the C major triad can be formed when C, E, and G:

    …which are the first, third, and fifth tones of the C major scale are played or heard together.

    The Minor Triad

    The minor triad is associated with the minor scale.

    Using the C minor scale:

    …the C minor triad can be formed when C, Eb, and G:

    …which are the first, third, and fifth tones of the C minor scale are played or heard together.

    Triad Transformation: From Simple To Sophisticated

    I’ll be showing you three harmonic ingredients that can transform any major or minor triad from being simple to being sophisticated.

    The first ingredient is the octave position, followed by the seventh tone, then the extensions. Let’s go ahead and see how these ingredients work.

    Simple To Sophisticated: Octave Position

    The major or minor triad can be sophisticated when it is played in octave position.

    “So, How Can A Triad Be Played In Octave Position?”

    Duplicating the root note of any major or minor triad makes it an octave position triad. For example, the C major triad:

    …can be played in octave position when its root note (which is C):

    …is duplicated to produce “C-C”:

    Consequently, the C major triad in octave position:

    “Check Out All The Major Triads In Octave Position…”

    The C major triad:

    The Db major triad:

    The D major triad:

    The Eb major triad:

    The E major triad:

    The F major triad:

    The Gb major triad:

    The G major triad:

    The Ab major triad:

    The A major triad:

    The Bb major triad:

    The B major triad:

    “Take Note…”

    Minor triads can also be played in octave position. For example, the C minor triad:

    …can also be played in octave position:

    …when its root note (which is C):

    …is duplicated (“C-C”):

    Final Words

    Using these ingredients, you can sophisticate the 2-chord, 3-chord, and 6-chord, which are basically minor triads in every major key.

    In the key of C major:

    …the 3 chord (which is the E minor triad):

    …can be sophisticated thus:

    Played in octave position:

    Played with the seventh tone:

    Played with extensions (like the ninth and eleventh):

    See you in the next lesson!

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    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as the head of education, music consultant, and chief content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with hundreds of thousands of musicians across the world.

    Attention: To learn more about this, I recommend our 500+ page course: The "Official Guide To Piano Playing." Click here for more information.




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    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    1 Courage

    Sir when will the 500 page book be ready I have registered in the waiting list several times since last year and how are we going to know

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