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    The easiest way to remember minor scales!

    by Jermaine Griggs · 18 comments

    in Other Stuff

    This post is going to be short because the concept is so simple… if you know your major scales!

    Basically, every major scale comes with a paired minor scale.

    We call that the “relative minor” of whatever major key you’re in.

    How do you know where to find it? It’s simple.

    Go to the 6th tone!

    Let’s take C major, for example:

    C major
    C D E F G A B C
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7

    The 6th tone is “A.”

    That means, “A” is the relative minor of C. Very simple!

    Here are all the relative major/minor relationships out there:

    C major (relative major) / A minor (relative minor)
    Db major (relative major) / Bb minor (relative minor)
    D major (relative major) / B minor (relative minor)
    Eb major (relative major) / C minor (relative minor)
    E major (relative major) / C# minor (relative minor)
    F major (relative major) / D minor (relative minor)
    F# major (relative major) / D# minor (relative minor)
    G major (relative major) / E minor (relative minor)
    Ab major (relative major) / F minor (relative minor)
    A major (relative major) / F# minor (relative minor)
    Bb major (relative major) / G minor (relative minor)
    B major (relative major) / G# minor (relative minor)

    Now here’s the part that’s going to make you jump up and down…

    To play, let’s say, the “A minor” scale, all you have to do is play all the notes of the “C major scale” (its relative major) — beginning and ending on “A.”

    In other words, “A minor” and “C major” share the same EXACT notes. The only, and I mean the ONLY difference is the starting and ending notes of their scales.

    So if this is the “C major” scale (I’m going to use two octaves for this example):

    C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

    Then, this is the “A minor” scale:

    C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

    In other words:

    A B C D E F G A

    Was that simple or what? So if you know your major scales, you should also know your minor scales now!

    Until next time —

    Related posts:

    1. “Minor and Blues Scales” Crash Course
    2. Easy to Ways to Remember Large Chords
    3. Learning to play natural minor scales
    4. How to Remember Large Extended Chords Part 2
    5. Conversation With Students #2 (Relative Minor Concept)

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    { 18 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 samuel patrick

    sir please i want you to indicate their keys on the fret for example my key c on my piano is C E G. so please indicate this on the guitar fret for me thanks.

    Reply

    2 nate

    Dude it’s very simple for you to google “fretboard notes” and it will show you all the notes on the fretboard.

    Reply

    3 genji

    wow this helped me so much! thankyou for sharing!!!

    Reply

    4 mair

    Wow this is an amazing trick..i had so much trouble with trying to remember the minor chords with the whole step half step method…but this is a piece of cake!!!Thank you SOO much for this.. I feel like the cloud of minor scale confusion is gone..Thank you!!

    Reply

    5 David Fletccer

    Not to upset you too much but major means big and minor means small
    Any major interval can be made smaller (minor)
    Learn your harmonic minor first then learn melodic minor
    Both ascending and descending and just think of it as different ways
    To approach other notes/chords – the different approach notes add different
    Tensions and resolves –
    Listen to some of the jazz standards and it will blow your mind
    Have fun by all means but don’t just assume the 6th degree relative
    Minor wraps it all up

    Reply

    6 Prasad

    Dear sir.,

    I have been practising the both Major & Minor scales for the last three months.Please let me know how playing of these major & minor scles will
    help in playing the songs. please do reply

    with thanks. Yours sincerely ., Prasad

    Reply

    7 rock

    Hi… glad u asked this question… once you learn all the scales and chords it will be very easy to pick up songs just by listening to the songs. Moreover u will know what exactly u r playing. On the other hand, if u learn chords directly den ul be more of a BLIND GUITARIST….!
    hope dis helped…

    Reply

    8 David Fletccer

    In learning the major and minor scales it may help you and aid you in playing songs
    However it’s better to start with intervals which then will allow
    You to build chords (chordal tones) which then when you think
    About it once you then know your chordal tones you can add
    Your scale notes to add movement so you could move from Cmaj to Aminor by using
    a G (diatonically) or use a G# to lead you into A minor
    So in C major on a lead sheet the G would have an accidental #
    So learn scales yes but more importantly learn how to use those scales
    In order to build chords as opposed to most metal players who use them to
    Shred and never learn anything

    Reply

    9 abbieyy

    thank you this helped a lot but oyu could do some more of the harder examples.
    I am doing my grade 2 on clarinet and find it hard to learn scales, is there any other methods of learning i could use?
    i thank you a lot because all the other sites seem to want you to buy things which i can affor and is proberly a scam!(i think that is the web adress to my bebo im noy sure…) xx

    Reply

    10 OXM

    Hi, uh, I’m a clarinettist and I would like to know how does this match from the bflat clarinet notes, since this is for, I assumed, piano, right? It’s kind of confusing for me… Please help!

    Reply

    11 Ewan

    Same notes, being b flat doesn’t change anything except the actual sound.

    Reply

    12 Music heart1

    Great!!!!! So helpful!

    Reply

    13 Gina

    I hate to put a downer on all of this but it’s wrong. An A minor scale is not exactly the same as a C major scale played only from A-A; that scale is what is musically known as a the Aeolian Mode. An A minor scale has a raised 7th (as is common in all harmonic minor scales) which is the G#.
    Hope this helps.

    Reply

    14 Erik Frederiksen

    They are referring to natural minor scales, not harmonic minor scales. In a natural A minor scale, it is all natural notes. There is no G#. You are referring to an a harmonic A minor scale. (Which like you said, does have an G#) They are basically explaining the relationship between major and minor scales show in the circle of fifths.

    Reply

    15 Jermaine Griggs

    Erik is right. You’re not referring to the regular natural minor scale. You’re referring to the harmonic minor scale.

    The “A” natural minor scale, as stated by this blog post, is A B C D E F G A (the same notes as the C major scale).

    The funny thing is this is easily searchable on google. When I correct people, I make sure I’m triple right. Otherwise, the joke’s on me.

    Reply

    16 David Fletccer

    Just remember the relative minors are not minor keys!
    So In C major the diatonic relative A minor is not the same thing as the Key
    Of A minor !
    Key of A minor has a G#
    C Major does not have a G#

    Reply

    17 J

    What is the blog post titled?

    You’ve given us more confusion. If someone wants to remember minor scales, this post does the job.

    Reply

    18 Edward

    What is a tone ?(Now go to the 6th tone)

    Reply

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