• The Application Of The Lydian Dominant Scale In Chord Formation

    in Chords & Progressions,Experienced players,General Music,Gospel music,Jazz music,Piano,Scales

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    The goal of this lesson is to show you the application of the lydian dominant scale in chord formation.

    Attention: You’ll appreciate the application of the lydian dominant scale in chord formation more if you’re a gospel or jazz pianist. However, if you’re neither a gospel nor a jazz pianist, it’s also important you learn about the chords that can be formed using the lydian dominant scale.

    In a previous lesson, we started out by learning the definition and formation of the lydian dominant scale in all twelve notes on the keyboard.

    Today, we’re taking it a step further by exploring the triadic, seventh, and extended chords that can be formed using the lydian dominant scale.

    A Quick Review Of The Lydian Dominant Scale

    Preliminaries

    Due to the fact that the lydian dominant scale is one of the modes of the melodic minor scale, it would be appropriate for us to highlight the melodic minor scale before we proceed.

    The melodic minor scale is one of the traditional scales that every piano player must reckon with. Using the natural minor scale anyone can form the melodic minor scale by raising its sixth and seventh tones.

    Raising the sixth and seventh tones of the C natural minor scale :

    …(which are Ab and Bb):

    …by a half step (to A and B):

    …produces the C melodic minor scale:

    Now that we have an idea of what the melodic minor scale is, it’s easier to describe the lydian dominant scale.

    “What Is A Lydian Dominant Scale?”

    The lydian dominant scale is the fourth mode of the melodic minor scale.

    Starting and ending the melodic minor scale on its fourth tone produces the lydian dominant scale. For example, starting and ending the C melodic minor scale:

    …on its fourth tone (which is F):

    …produces the F lydian dominant scale:

    If you’ll want to learn more about the definition and formation of the lydian dominant scale, click here.

    “Check Out All The Lydian Dominant Scales On The Keyboard…”

    The C lydian dominant scale:

    The Db lydian dominant scale:

    The D lydian dominant scale:

    The Eb lydian dominant scale:

    The E lydian dominant scale:

    The F lydian dominant scale:

    The Gb lydian dominant scale:

    The G lydian dominant scale:

    The Ab lydian dominant scale:

    The A lydian dominant scale:

    The Bb lydian dominant scale:

    The B lydian dominant scale:

    Chord Formation Using The Lydian Dominant Scale

    The lydian dominant scale can be used in the formation of various chord classes and we’ll be looking at the triad, seventh chord, and extended chord that can be formed from the lydian dominant scale.

    Formation Of The Dominant Triad

    Using the C lydian dominant scale:

    …a dominant triad can be formed when its first, third, and fifth tones are played together.

    The first, third, and fifth tones of the C lydian dominant scale:

    …are C, E, and G respectively:

    So, the C dominant triad:

    …which is chord 5 in the key of F major:

    …can be derived from the lydian dominant scale. Consequently, it’s okay for anyone to improvise over the C dominant triad:

    …using the C lydian dominant scale:

     

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    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as a music consultant and content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with thousands of musicians across the world.

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    { 2 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 hsm3

    I wish these posts had more meat. Half of this one is just replay of the previous “definition” post, whereas a link would be sufficient. Quoting all twelve versions of the scale is just adding bulk. When we finally get to chord formation, we do one triad and its over. Where is all the info on application? Where is this scale used in real songs? Why would I use it vs more typical scales to put over C Major? What other chords can be formed within the scale, and how are they useful?

    Reply

    2 Zino

    great post

    Reply

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