• A Complete Guide to Piano Chords

    in Beginners,Chords & Progressions,Scales,Theory

    piano chords feature image

    Piano chords are like blood to the human body. Without them, your songs won’t have life.

    “Notes create scales, scales create chords, chords create progressions, and progressions create songs.”

    If chords are blood, chord progressions represent the flow of blood.

    In this post, we’re going to explore all the different types of piano chords you need to know in order to play most of today’s songs.

    Piano Chords – Notes

    I don’t want to assume you know all the notes of the piano, so here’s a handy diagram illustrating them all:

    pianonotes

    The piano uses the first 7 letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

    These are shown on the white keys.

    But each note can also be sharped (raised) or flatted (lowered).

    Sharp = ♯ = Raise

    Flat = ♭ = Lower

    *Just remember a “flat” tire lowers the car. Lower means going deeper in pitch to the left on the piano. Raise means going higher in pitch to the right on the piano.

    #1 Mistake with sharps and flats

    A lot of musicians think sharps and flats are only designated to black keys. Sure, if you lower D, you get Db (pronounced “D flat”), the black key directly to the left of D. And if you raise F, you get F# (pronounced “F sharp”), the black key directly to the right of F.

    But you can also raise and lower white keys that do not have black keys directly in front or back of them. For example, lowering F is called “Fb” (“F flat”), even though to the beginner, it’s the same as playing “E.” Likewise, raising E is called “E#” (“E sharp”), even though it uses the key most people know as “F.”

    The fancy name for the different spellings of the same tone is “Enharmonic.”

    These may seem like advanced topics, but getting this clarification EARLY will ensure that you not only play piano chords well, but spell the notes correctly.

    Piano Chords – Intervals

    An “interval” in music is simply distance – or the difference between two tones.

    Just like inches, feet, yards, and meters describe distance in physical spaces, intervals like “half steps” and “whole steps” describe distance in music.

    Here’s a poem:

    “Half steps” are from key to key with no keys in between,
    “Whole steps” always skip a key with ONE key in between.

    In the previous section, when we talked about how flatting a note lowers it and sharping a note raises it, we were referencing half steps.

    These tones are all half steps apart because there are NO keys in between:

    piano chords - half steps

    piano chords - half steps

    piano chords - half steps

    These tones are a whole step apart because there are ONE key in between them:

    piano chords - half steps

    piano chords - half steps

    piano chords - half steps

    With a mastery of half and whole steps, you’re ready to learn what chords are made of.

    Piano Chords – Three Methods To Build Them

    We’ll cover three ways to build piano chords. One using scales, one using intervals, and one using the combining of chords to produce bigger ones.

    Major scales

    You don’t have to be a musician to know the sound of a major scale. We’ve all heard them.

    There are 12 primary major scales in total – one for each unique key of the piano.

    A major scale has 7 unique notes in it.

    The easiest to remember is the C major scale.

    C major:
    piano chords - half steps
    *The C major scale has all white keys and no black keys.

    But the other scales aren’t so easy to remember. For example…

    Db major:
    piano chords - half steps

    So how did we form these scales?

    With your friends, the “half step” and “whole step.”

    Here’s a cool mnemonic device I made up over 10 years ago to help you remember the formula for major scales:

    Why Won’t He Wear White When Hot”

    (I’ll spare you the full story but it stems from my wife making fun of me for wearing really hot and dark clothes during 95 degree summer weather. “Why Won’t He Wear White When Hot?” she asked.)

    Just take the first letter of every word and that tells you whether to use a whole step or a half step.

    A lot easier than having to remember:

    W W H W W W H

    You can form ANY major scale you want by starting on any tone and using the above WWHWWWH formula.

    For example, forming the “F major” scale is as easy as starting on F:

    Adding a whole step because the first word of our formula is “Why”.

    “G” is a whole step up from F.

    F – G

    “Won’t” is the next word so we need to add another whole step to this scale. That gives us “A.”

    F – G – A

    “He” is the next word so we need to switch things up and add a half step to the mix. That gives us Bb (B flat).

    F – G – A – Bb

    (If you were tempted to use B instead of Bb, you probably got carried away with the two whole steps in the beginning. Don’t forget to switch to the half step!)

    “Wear” is the next word so we’re back to needing a whole step. That’s “C.”

    F – G – A – Bb – C

    “White” is up next, which calls for another whole step. That’s “D.”

    F – G – A – Bb – C – D

    “When” gives us another whole step, “E.”

    F – G – A – Bb – C – D – E

    “Hot” gives us our final half step, which will always bring us back home to the same note that started our scale (but just higher).

    F major:
    piano chords - half steps

    Homework: You got C major and F major down. Can you figure out the other 10 major scales?

    Piano Chords – Using major scales to learn chords

    With major scales under your belt, learning chords will become a cinch.

    Let’s go back to C major and let’s number this scale:
    piano chords - half steps

    C is 1
    D is 2
    E is 3
    F is 4
    G is 5
    A is 6
    B is 7

    With these numbers, you can learn almost any chord out there!

    Major Triad Piano Chord

    Chord Type: Major triad
    Formula: 1+3+5
    Notes in C: C + E + G

    piano chords - half steps

    Just as it looks, we took the 1st, 3rd, and 5th tones of the C major scale, played them together, and produced our first chord – C major.

    Minor Triad Piano Chord

    Chord Type: Minor triad
    Formula: 1 +♭3 +5

    *With minor chords, you’ll be putting what you learned about “flats” (♭) into good use. A ♭3 means to take whatever the third tone of the scale is and lower it by a half-step.

    As a reminder, never change the letter when you “flat” it. To flat a “C” does not give you “B” (even though it may seem like it). Instead, it gives you a C flat. NEVER CHANGE THE LETTER when you flat it. More on that topic here.

    Notes in C: C + Eb + G

    piano chords - half steps

    Diminished Triad Piano Chord

    Chord Type: Diminished triad
    Formula: 1+♭3+♭5

    *Do you see a pattern here? Most chords will use some version of the 1, 3, and 5th tones (later, we’ll add in the 7th tone, which is HUGE in music). Diminished chords take the sad and serious sound of minor chords even further by flatting yet another tone (the 5th). This gives you a scary-sounding chord, but is used in tons of situations.

    Notes in C: C + Eb + Gb

    piano chords - half steps

    Augmented Triad Piano Chord

    Chord Type: Augmented triad
    Formula: 1+3+♯5

    *The augmented chord almost does the opposite of the minor and diminished. We take the regular major triad and raise the 5th tone.

    Notes in C: C + E + G#

    piano chords - half steps

    Diminished means to make smaller.
    Augmented means to make larger.

    Isn’t that exactly what these chords have done?

    Consonance and Dissonance

    These are the opposite of each other.

    What is consonant is not dissonant and what is dissonant is not consonant.

    I know, sounds confusing.

    According to wikipedia, “Consonance and dissonance define a level of sweetness / harshness, pleasantness / unpleasantness, acceptability / unacceptability, of the sounds or intervals under consideration.”

    In other words, consonant chords and intervals sound good and harmonious to us. Dissonant ones sound less harmonious and have more tension.

    Major and minor chords have more consonance than diminished and augmented chords.

    If I had to rank them by consonance, it’d be:

    Major chords
    Minor chords
    Diminished chords
    Augmented chords

    THIS DOESN’T MEAN DISSONANCE IS A BAD THING.

    In fact, at one point (hundreds of years ago), dissonant chords and intervals like diminished chords and tritones (another topic) were banned from the church! They were called the “devil’s interval.”

    This is not the case today. In fact, most modern musicians aggressively search for ways to add “flavorful dissonance” to their playing. It is dissonance that creates the unpredictability and sound that characterizes much of today’s contemporary gospel, soul, R&B, and similar genres.

    I call these four chords – major, minor, diminished, augmented – the “FANTASTIC FOUR.”

    These are your four foundational chords. With these four chord types, you can learn practically all others (I’ll prove it to you in a second).

    Piano Chords – Using intervals to learn chords

    You’ve already learned the foundational chords but I want to cover the second way to build them. This method takes an “intervallic” approach (fancy word for “interval” or distance).

    Whereas the major scale approach simply gave you the numbers of the scale to combine together, this one will use distance to determine the chord.

    Introducing Major and Minor Thirds

    When it comes to intervals, major and minor thirds make the world go round n round.

    And the great part is you already have what it takes to create thirds.

    A Quick Crash Course On Intervals

    There are two classes of intervals: Generic and Specific.

    Generic intervals won’t tell you specifically what to play but it’ll make sure you’re referencing the notes correctly. Specific intervals then tell you exactly what notes to play.

    Let me explain.

    Intervals are described with numbers: first, seconds, thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, and sevenths.

    (We could take it a step further and move into extended intervals like ninths, tenths, elevenths, and thirteenths but we’ll leave these out for now).

    Since an interval is the distance between two notes, if you want to figure out any interval, just count up the number of alphabet letters encompassed between the notes.

    What you’re doing when you’re counting alphabet letters is trying to figure out the GENERIC INTERVAL at work first.

    You’re trying to figure out if the interval is a third vs fourth, or a sixth vs seventh (many musicians get this wrong).

    And at this point, sharps and flats don’t even matter. We’re only counting alphabet letters so drop the sharps and the flats. We’ll come back to them when we’re trying to figure out the specific interval (whether it’s major, minor, diminished, augmented, or perfect).

    Let’s do a few:

    Db to Gb
    piano chords - generic intervals

    What generic interval is this?

    Answer & Explanation:

    The first thing you do is drop the sharps and/or flats. We don’t need them right now. We’ll bring them back later.

    So we’re left with:

    D
    and
    G

    Now, take it back to Kindergarten and simply count the alphabet letters encompassed in this interval. Include the starting and ending letters (D and G).

    D
    E
    F
    G

    *Even though the “E” and “F” aren’t played, they are inside, or encompassed in the interval.

    Because this has four letters, it’s definitely a FOURTH.

    What type of fourth depends on what we figure out in the “specific” interval step (but that’s not important right now; this example was solely about understanding generic intervals).

    Knowing about generic intervals is important because a specific interval can never be different from its generic interval.

    For example, since notes can be raised and lowered, sometimes musicians get confused over whether to call something, for example, a minor third or augmented second since those both produce the same sound. Or an augmented fourth and diminished fifth since those, too, produce the same sound.

    Count up the alphabet letters and that’ll give you the answer!

    Major and Minor Thirds – Constructed (Specific Intervals)

    With what you know already, how many letters do major and minor thirds encompass?

    The answer is: Three

    Where major and minor thirds will differ is by how many half steps it takes to construct them.

    Major thirds = 4 half steps
    Minor thirds = 3 half steps

    There you have it…

    Specific third intervals and the difference between major and minor thirds.

    Let’s try a few:

    Major third on D:

    Start on D.

    Move up one half step (D#)
    Move up another half step (E)
    Move up another half step (F)
    Move up another half step (F#) – that’s 4 half steps.

    Major third on D: D + F#

    piano chords - generic intervals

    Does it also pass the generic interval test? In other words, does it encompass three alphabet letters?

    Let’s drop the sharps and flats:

    D
    E
    F

    Looks like 3 alphabet letters to me.

    Check out this interval: D + Gb
    piano chords - generic intervals

    Even though this interval sounds like a major third, is it really?

    Because we chose to use “Gb” as the highest note instead of F#, this totally changes the type of interval. While there are still 4 half steps at work, it fails the generic interval test:

    D
    E
    F
    G

    There are 4 alphabet letters. That means this interval is a fourth. It’s just a “SMALL” fourth or what we call a “diminished” fourth.

    Major, minor, diminished, augmented, and most other chords you’ll learn use THIRDS.

    And now that you know how to correctly create them and what letters to use, you should never spell a chord wrong again… even big, fancy chords.

    Let’s turn our correct major third (D + F#) into a minor third. Since a minor third has only 3 half steps, simply lower the F# to F and now you’re playing a minor third interval:

    piano chords - generic intervals

    Notice, we haven’t changed letters. We’re still encompassing 3 alphabet letters between D and F:

    D
    E
    F

    Generic test? Pass.
    Specific test? Pass.

    Fantastic Four Piano Chords Using Intervals

    Major Triad Piano Chord

    Chord Type: Major triad
    Formula: Major third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + E + G

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (minor third) = E + G
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine both intervals: C + [E] + G
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Minor triad
    Formula: Minor third + major third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + G

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (major third) = Eb + G
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine both intervals: C + [Eb] + G
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Diminished triad
    Formula: Minor third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + Gb

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (minor third) = Eb + Gb
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine both intervals: C + [Eb] + G
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Augmented triad
    Formula: Major third + major third
    Notes in C: C + E + G#

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (major third) = E + G#
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine both intervals: C + [E] + G#
    piano chords - half steps

    Seventh Piano Chords – Major Scale & Intervallic Method

    Now that you’ve gotten a comprehensive look at how to form intervals, scales, and foundational chords, let’s take it a step further by expanding our chords.

    Let’s learn:

    • Major seventh chord
    • Minor seventh chord
    • Diminished seventh chord
    • Augmented major seventh chord
    • Half-Diminished seventh chord
    • Dominant seventh chord
    • Augmented seventh chord
    • Minor-major seventh chord

    Chord Type: Major seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+3+5+7
    Interval Formula: major third + minor third + major third
    Notes in C: C + E + G + B

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (minor third) = E + G
    piano chords - half steps

    G + (major third) = G + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + E + G + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Minor seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+♭3+5+♭7
    Interval Formula: minor third + major third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + G + Bb

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (major third) = Eb + G
    piano chords - half steps

    G + (minor third) = G + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + Eb + G + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Diminished seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+♭3+♭5+♭♭7
    Interval Formula: minor third + minor third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + Gb + Bbb

    *Don’t let the ♭♭ (double flat) throw you off. If one ♭ means to lower by one half step, then ♭♭ must mean to lower by how many half steps? You got it, 2. (And because 2 half steps are equal to 1 whole step, you can think of this as one whole step as well). In other words, this formula could really be 1 + ♭3 + b5 + 6 (although saying “A” instead of “Bbb” would not be correct for generic interval purposes).

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (minor third) = Eb + Gb
    piano chords - half steps

    Gb + (minor third) = Gb + Bbb (aka – “A”)
    piano chords - half steps
    *As funny as it sounds, my piano graphic script does not do “Bbb” so I’m forced to place “A” there. But you know the truth!!!

    Combine all intervals: C + Eb + Gb + Bbb (aka – “A”)
    piano chords - half steps
    *See note above :-)

    Chord Type: Augmented major seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+3+#5+7
    Interval Formula: major third + major third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + E + G# + B

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (major third) = E + G#
    piano chords - half steps

    G# + (minor third) = G# + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + E + G# + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Half-Diminished seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+♭3+♭5+♭7
    Interval Formula: minor third + minor third + major third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + Gb + Bb

    *Unlike the Diminished seventh chord, the half-diminished chord is a little more watered down and gets a major third up top (giving us a regular Bb instead of Bbb).

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (minor third) = Eb + Gb
    piano chords - half steps

    Gb + (major third) = Gb + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + Eb + Gb + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Dominant seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+3+5+b7
    Interval Formula: major third + minor third + minor third
    Notes in C: C + E + G + Bb

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (minor third) = E + G
    piano chords - half steps

    G + (minor third) = G + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + E + G + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Augmented seventh chord (aka – “Augmented dominant seventh chord”)
    Scale Formula: 1+3+#5+b7
    Interval Formula: major third + major third + diminished third
    Notes in C: C + E + G# + Bb

    *This one is very similar to the dominant seventh chord, except the 5th degree is raised. This chord is not to be confused with the major augmented seventh chord. A diminished third takes a minor third and lowers it once again. This is where understanding generic intervals really helps you.

    C + (major third) = C + E
    piano chords - half steps

    E + (major third) = E + G#
    piano chords - half steps

    G# + (diminished third) = G# + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + E + G# + Bb
    piano chords - half steps

    For a bonus, let’s cover this rare chord:

    Chord Type: Minor-major seventh chord
    Scale Formula: 1+♭3+5+7
    Interval Formula: minor third + major third + major third
    Notes in C: C + Eb + G + B

    *This chord gives you the beginning of a minor triad (C+Eb) but the ending of a major seventh chord (G+B).

    C + (minor third) = C + Eb
    piano chords - half steps

    Eb + (major third) = Eb + G
    piano chords - half steps

    G + (major third) = G + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Combine all intervals: C + Eb + G + B
    piano chords - half steps

    Piano Chords Method #3 – “Polychords”

    While we won’t cover extended chords (ninths, elevenths, thirteenths; See my “4 Steps to Next Level Growth” course), it’s important to understand what polychords are.

    This is when you combine smaller chords to create bigger chords.

    For example, since we’ve already explored major, minor, augmented, diminished, and dominant seventh chords above, here’s another approach.

    Remember when I said the fantastic four chords (major triads, minor triads, diminished triads, augmented triads) can be used to learn just about any other chord?

    That still holds absolutely true. I just had to show you the major scale and intervallic approaches FIRST.

    Keep in mind: This approach requires that you know ALL four foundational chords in ALL 12 keys. That’s 48 chords (4 x 12 keys) but once you know them, you have the key to play literally hundreds of other chords.

    So here are other ways to get the same chords:

    Chord Type: Major seventh chord
    Polychord formula: 1 + 3-minor triad
    Notes in C: C + E minor = C + [E + G + B]

    *What this means is: Play the 1-tone in your bass (the 1 tone is the title or keynote of the chord, in this case C). Then, go to the third tone and play that tone’s minor chord. So we’d simply hit C in our left hand and an E minor triad (E+G+B) in our right.

    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Minor seventh chord
    Polychord formula: 1 + ♭3-major triad
    Notes in C: C + E♭ major = C + [Eb + G + Bb]

    *What this means is: Play the 1-tone in your bass (the 1 tone is the title or keynote of the chord, in this case C). Then, go to the flat-third tone (Eb) and play that tone’s major chord. So we’d simply hit C in our left hand and an Eb major triad (Eb+G+Bb) in our right.

    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Diminished seventh chord
    Polychord formula: 1 + ♭3-diminished triad
    Notes in C: C + E♭ diminished = C + [Eb + Gb + Bbb]

    *What this means is: Play the 1-tone in your bass. Then, go to the flat-third tone (Eb) and play that tone’s diminished chord. So we’d simply hit C in our left hand and an Eb diminished triad (Eb+G+Bbb) in our right.

    piano chords - half steps

    *”Bbb” is enharmonic with (“makes the same sound as”) “A” but my graphics program won’t illustrate Bbb.

    Chord Type: Augmented major seventh chord
    Polychord formula: 1 + 3-major triad
    Notes in C: C + E major = C + [E + G# + B]

    *What this means is: Play the 1-tone in your bass. Then, go to the third tone (E) and play that tone’s major chord. So we’d simply hit C in our left hand and an E major triad (E+G#+B) in our right.

    piano chords - half steps

    Chord Type: Dominant seventh chord
    Polychord formula: 1 + 3-diminished triad
    Notes in C: C + E diminished = C + [E + G + Bb]

    *What this means is: Play the 1-tone in your bass. Then, go to the third tone and play that tone’s diminished chord. So we’d simply hit C in our left hand and an E diminished triad (E+G+Bb) in our right.

    piano chords - half steps

    Taking Your Piano Chords Studies A Step Further

    Wow, you’ve learned a lot in this blog guide (and I hope you’ve enjoyed it). But if you’re serious about learning even more (plus extended chords, progressions/patterns, how to find the key of a song, etc), you’ll want to consider my “4 Steps To Next Level Playing” workbook.

    screenshot-2015-11-01-152518png

    There you have it. A complete guide to piano chords from yours truly.

    Until next time.

    The following two tabs change content below.
    Hi, I'm Jermaine Griggs, founder of this site. We teach people how to express themselves through the language of music. Just as you talk and listen freely, music can be enjoyed and played in the same way... if you know the rules of the "language!" I started this site at 17 years old in August 2000 and more than a decade later, we've helped literally millions of musicians along the way. Enjoy!

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    { 18 comments… read them below or add one }

    1 Jerry

    Jermain, i can’t tell you enough how grateful i am for your work here. This guide was nothing short of amazing and really gave a beginning to end look at chords and how to form them. I’m sharing this with all my musician friends who are learning as this should be recommended reading for everyone.

    Reply

    2 Jermaine Griggs

    Thank you Jerry! :-)

    Reply

    3 Tony

    I was under the impression by the wording and pictures in the email that this was for a book not web pages or pdf files. Good lessons, not happy about the bait and switch.

    Reply

    4 Jermaine Griggs

    Tony, see above for the link to the pdf. Or click here:

    http://hearandplay.s3.amazonaws.com/Files/ACompleteGuidetoPianoChords.pdf

    Reply

    5 Yat Hoong

    Jermaine, thank you for your generosity for giving out this very useful guide. Your description using more familiar language to me like raise, lower, distance in inches/cm and describing the effects such as sweetness and harshness; is so much easier to understand for a engineering person like me and consequently at absolute ground zero for music. Thank God for directing me to your website I think about two years ago. My daughter is learning the keyboard at school and I, the ukulele but this guide is especially beneficial in helping me in learning music in general. The fact that I have yet to take up any of your email offers is due other than a lack of time, it is also my excruciatingly painful journey in learning music. It is also because I have selected gospel music when I should have chosen music in general instead so your email offers on mostly gospel music appears not suitable. I checked your website and is in the process of considering the purchase of the Chords 101 instead which looks more suitable for my daughter. This guide certainly helps me tell the suitability much more easily. Thank you for your efforts and generosity again.

    Reply

    6 Hove

    oh, Jermaine thanks so much for a wonderful job. good stuff man, stay blessed.

    Reply

    7 King David

    I’ve always tell my musician friends that I got the best TEACHER in the world ;-)
    You have the best way of making things easier.
    Big thanks!

    Reply

    8 Yongama

    you don’t have PDF file for this guide?

    Reply

    9 Bill

    The pdf link is about. First few paragraphs, can’t miss it.

    Reply

    10 Emmanuel Essien

    Hi Jermaine,

    This is drop dead simple. “polychords” made simple. Please I need to know the ploychords in other scales degrees apart from the tonic. Thanks!

    Reply

    11 Jermaine Griggs

    Check out these other posts on polychords: http://www.hearandplay.com/main/?s=polychords

    Reply

    12 Ehsan

    Thanks.

    It is good to see the keys by different color and learn the chord but it could be better to hear the sound of chords with any tonic.
    This web application is helpful

    http://rameshgar.com/en/chord-ear-training

    It has more than 40 chord types and you can play with the options and watch and hear the chords on piano

    Reply

    13 Sonjoy Bhattacharya

    Hi Jermaine,
    This is really good book. But there is only that the chords are restricted withing 7th
    series.
    thank you very much…

    Reply

    14 Peter LaFosse

    A very good lesson well put together and beneficial. Thanks

    Reply

    15 james

    Can’t expresses my sincere thanks enough to you for this rare gift.

    THANKS A MILLION!

    Reply

    16 medson

    Jesus after reading I feel like a teacher myself thank you

    Reply

    17 pravin jadhav

    Nice Lesson

    Reply

    18 Eleazar

    Thank you so much. I now know the basis of chords. God bless you for the great work you are doing here

    Reply

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