• Essential Chord Progressions Every Gospel Musician Must Be Familiar With

    in Chords & Progressions,Gospel music,Jazz music,Piano

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    On this page, you’ll learn the essential chord progressions every gospel musician must be familiar with.

    Using the following chord types:

    Major seventh chord

    Minor seventh chord

    Dominant seventh chord

    Half-diminished seventh chord

    …you can have a handful of progressions that can add more excitement to your accompaniment.

    Let’s get started!

    Essential Chord Progressions

    Although there are several chord progression types, we’re focusing on cyclical chord progressions — which are chord progressions based on a fixed interval between successive root notes.

    The musical clock:

    …which is a geometrical representation of all the twelve unique musical notes would guide us in this segment as we proceed into learning these essential chord progressions.

    The 2-5-1 Chord Progression

    In the key of C major:

    …the 2-5-1 chord progression entails a movement (aka – “root progression”) from the second tone (which is D):

    …to the fifth tone (which is G):

    …then to the first tone (which is C):

    On the second tone is the D minor seventh chord:

    On the fifth tone is the G dominant seventh chord:

    On the first tone is the C major seventh chord:

    “Altogether, Here’s The 2-5-1 Chord Progression…”

    Chord 2:

    Chord 5:

    Chord 1:

    “Here’s The Application Of The 2-5-1 Chord Progression…”

    The 2-5-1 chord progression is found at the ending of most songs and this is because most songs end on chord 1. For example, it is the first progression in the jazz standard Autumn Leaves.

    You may check it out:

    The falling leaves:

    …[passing chord]:

    Drift by the window:

    The 3-6-2 Chord Progression

    Still in the key of C major:

    …the 3-6-2 chord progression entails a movement (aka – “root progression”) from the third tone (which is E):

    …to the sixth tone (which is A):

    …then to the second tone (which is D):

    On the third tone is the E half-diminished seventh chord:

    On the sixth tone is the A altered chord:

    On the second tone is the D minor seventh chord:

    “Altogether, Here’s The 3-6-2 Chord Progression…”

    Chord 3:

    Chord 6:

    Chord 2:

    “Here’s The Application Of The 3-6-2 Chord Progression…”

    The goal of the 3-6-2 chord progression is to create a movement to chord 2 and that’s why the chord progression ends on chord 2.

    So, if you’re looking for the right progression that would always lead to chord 2, search no further, the 3-6-2 chord progression is absolutely suitable.

    The #4-7-3 Chord Progression

    The next chord progression on the list is the #4-7-3 chord progression, which entails a movement (aka – “root progression”) from the raised fourth tone (which is F#):

    …to the seventh tone (which is B):

    …then to the third tone (which is E):

    On the raised fourth tone is the F# half-diminished seventh chord:

    On the seventh tone is the B altered chord:

    On the third tone is the E minor seventh chord:

    “Altogether, Here’s The #4-7-3 Chord Progression…”

    Chord #4:

    Chord 7:

    Chord 3:

    “Here’s The Application Of The #4-7-3 Chord Progression…”

    This is the chord progressions that moves to chord 3 in the key, starting from the raised fourth. In the song Glory to the Lamb, it can be applied thus:

    Unto:

    …you I:

    …lift my voice in:

    Sounds nice, right? That’s the idea.

    The 5-1-4 Chord Progression

    A chord progression from the fifth tone (which is G):

    …to the first tone (which is C):

    …then to the fourth tone (which is F):

    …in the key of C major:

    …produces the 5-1-4 chord progression.

    On the fifth tone is the G minor seventh chord:

    On the first tone is the C dominant seventh chord:

    On the fourth tone is the F major seventh chord:

    “Altogether, Here’s The 5-1-4 Chord Progression…”

    Chord 5:

    Chord 1:

    Chord 4:

    “Here’s The Application Of The 5-1-4 Chord Progression…”

    The 5-1-4 chord progression is designed to progress to the chord of the fourth tone (aka – “chord 4”) which is the F major seventh chord:

    …in this case.

    The 7-3-6 Chord Progression

    In the key of C major:

    …the 7-3-6 chord progression entails a movement (aka – “root progression”) from the seventh tone (which is B):

    …to the third tone (which is E):

    …then to the sixth tone (which is A):

    On the seventh tone is the B half-diminished seventh chord:

    On the third tone is the E altered chord:

    On the sixth tone is the A minor seventh chord:

    “Altogether, Here’s The 7-3-6 Chord Progression…”

    Chord 7:

    Chord 3:

    Chord 6:

    “Here’s The Application Of The 7-3-6 Chord Progression…”

    If you’re looking for the right progression that would always lead to chord 6, say hello to the 7-3-6 chord progression.

    Final Words

    Using the essential chord progressions covered in this lesson, you can play a variety of gospel and jazz songs.

    In a subsequent lesson, we’ll be looking at the application of these essential chord progressions in regular jazz and gospel songs.

    But before then, practicing and mastering these chord progressions in other keys on the keyboard is highly recommended.

    All the best!

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    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as a music consultant and content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with thousands of musicians across the world.

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    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    1 NWAOBIALA David

    Thanks for this sir God bless you Dr pokey

    Reply

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