• 2-5-1 Chord Progressions To End Your Favorite Christmas Songs With

    in Chords & Progressions,General Music,Piano,Playing By Ear,Playing songs,Seasonal music

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    In today’s lesson, we’ll be learning 2-5-1 chord progressions that you can end your favorite Christmas songs with.

    The classic 2-5-1 chord progression has its common place in gospel and jazz music – especially at the end of most songs. As a result, we’re dedicating this lesson to showing you some 2-5-1 chord progressions that can be used to end some of your favorite Christmas songs.

    However, before we get into all of that, let’s review the classic 2-5-1 chord progression.

    A Review Of The Classic 2-5-1 Chord Progression

    There are eight degrees in every key (whether major or minor), and in the case of the key of C major:

    C is the first

    D is the second

    E is the third

    F is the fourth

    G is the fifth

    A is the sixth

    B is the seventh

    C is the eighth

    Chords can be formed on these scale-degrees, and the movement from one scale degree chord to another creates a chord progression.

    “What Is A 2-5-1 Chord Progression?”

    The chord movement from chord 2, to chord 5, then to chord 1 produces a 2-5-1 chord progression. In the key of C major:

    …the 2-5-1 chord progression progresses from the D minor triad:

    …to the G major triad:

    …then to the C major triad:

    “The 2-5-1 Chord Progression Using Seventh Chords…”

    The 2-5-1 chord progression sounds a lot better if seventh chords are used. Applying scale degree seventh chords in the key of C major:

    …this entails a chord movement from the D minor seventh chord:

    …to the G dominant seventh chord:

    …then to the C major seventh chord:

    A Breakdown Of The 2-5-1 Chord Progression

    The 2-5-1 chord progression is one of the strongest chord progressions in music because of the fifth interval between its root notes. For example, the 2-5-1 root progression in the key of C major progresses from D (the two):

    …to G (the five):

    …which is a descent by a fifth interval, then from G (the five):

    …to C (the one):

    …which is also a descent by a fifth interval.

    The main reason why the 2-5-1 chord progression is considered as one of the strongest progressions in music is because of the fifth interval between successive root notes.

    “Here’s The Implication Of The Root Progression By A Fifth Interval…”

    In tonal music, the strongest progression to chord one (aka – “the tonic chord”) is usually from chord five (aka – “the dominant chord”.) In the key of C major:

    …the strongest progression to the tonic chord (which is the C major triad):

    …is from the dominant chord (which is the G dominant seventh chord):

    …whose root is a fifth above the tonic chord.

    “Now Back To The 2-5-1 Chord Progression…”

    One of the reasons why the 2-5-1 chord progression is considered as a strong progression is because of this:

    In the key of C, where the 2-5-1 root progression moves from D to G, then to C. D is the dominant of G, while G is the dominant of C.

    The Importance Of The 2-5-1 Chord Progression

    The classic 2-5-1 chord progression is one of the chord progressions every musician must not be without – especially jazz and gospel musicians.

    This is largely because most of your favorite gospel songs (like hymns, congregational songs, and so on.) and jazz standards end with a 2-5-1 chord progression 95% of the time.

    In the next segment, I’ll be taking you to the next level by showing you step-by-step, the 2-5-1 chord progressions to end your favorite Christmas songs with.

    2-5-1 Chord Progressions That End Your Favorite Christmas Songs

    #1 – Silent Night

    Sle-eping [the D minor eleventh chord]:

    …heavenly [the G dominant seventh flat ninth]:

    …peace [C 6/9]:

    #2 – Oh Come O Ye Faithful

    Chri [the D dominant ninth chord]:

    …ist the [the Db altered chord]:

    …Lord [C 6/9]:

    #3 – Hark The Herald Angel Sing

    To the [the D minor eleventh chord]:

    …new born [the G dominant seventh flat ninth]:

    …king [C 6/9]:

    #4 – Ding Dong Merrily On High

    Sanna [the D dominant ninth chord]:

    …in ex [the G9sus4]:

    …celsis [C add9]:

    #5 – Deck The Halls

    Lala [the D minor eleventh chord]:

    …lala [the G dominant thirteenth flat ninth]:

    …la [C 6/9]:

    #6 – Joy To The World

    Ea-a-arth and [the D minor eleventh chord]:

    …nature [the G dominant thirteenth flat ninth]:

    …sing [C 6/9]:

    #7 – The First Noel

    I [the D altered chord]:

    …isra [the G 13 sus4]:

    …el [C major ninth]:

    Final Words

    From the songs we’ve covered in the previous segment, you’ve just learned several ways of approaching the 2-5-1 chord progression.

    We’ll be drawing the curtains for now, but before we do that, here are two tasks for you:

    Apply the 2-5-1 chord progressions learned in other songs

    Transpose the 2-5-1 chord progressions learned to other keys

    I’ll see you in another lesson.

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    Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. Inspired by my role model Jermaine Griggs, I started teaching musicians in my neighborhood in April 2005. Today, I'm privileged to work as a music consultant and content creator with HearandPlay Music Group sharing my wealth of knowledge with thousands of musicians across the world.

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    { 1 comment… read it below or add one }

    1 yesuael

    Jermaine hi this is the real deal now people wonder why is I became so clever these days thanks man you my hero

    Reply

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