HearandPlay.com November 2006  Newsletter
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Contents:
I. Welcome
II. Announcements
III. Online Classroom:
       "Organ Worship Basics & Chords"
 
Announcement: Have you benefited from HearandPlay.com (our lessons, courses, dvds, community)? Please visit http://www.hearandplay.com/yourstory to tell us your story and we'll include you on various areas of our website!
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Dear Musician,
 
Welcome to my November newsletter! In this issue, we'll cover the basics of the organ, some of the differences between the piano and organ, and some left-hand / right-hand / bass pedal chord voicings you can start learning right away!
 
If you're really intrigued by this lesson, then you'll really be excited about our two latest organ courses, "GospelKeys 350 - Praise & Devotional Songs" and "GospelKeys 450 - Worship Chords & Voicings." More information, including video clips and demonstrations, will be available very soon!
 
Enjoy this lesson and if you have any questions, feel free to post them on our message board!
 
 

 
 
"The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear" 300pg Course - Learn the secrets to playing literally any song on the piano with a few simple, "easy-to-understand" techniques and principles! Join Jermaine Griggs in learning tons of music theory, concepts, and tricks that will help you to learn piano by ear! Thousands of musicians have already taken advantage of this excellent program ... why not you?

"The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear" is full of easy-to-understand tricks, tips, techniques and secrets to playing piano by ear! For this month only, I've also been able to throw in a few bonus items (3 additional piano software programs). Click here to learn the secrets to playing absolutely any song on the piano in virtually minutes! You won't regret it!

 
 

Other sites to check out this month:

http://www.JermaineGriggs.com * http://www.hearandplay.com/itunes http://www.ChurchLadyDresses.com * http://www.hearandplayzone.com

 


Newsletter Archive - Click here or visit http://www.hearandplay.com/newsletters.html
 
Online videos - http://www.GospelKeys.com

 
Announcement: Have you benefited from HearandPlay.com (our lessons, courses, dvds, community)? Please visit http://www.hearandplay.com/yourstory to tell us your story and we'll include you on various areas of our website!
 
 
 
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Online Classroom:
 
 "Organ Worship Basics & Chords"
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Note: You might want to print this lesson out for easier reading...
 
 
Let's begin.
 
 
The organ is a lot different from the piano, although the concept of progressions and how chord changes work generally remain the same.
 
Basically, a "2-5-1" progression on the piano is still a "2-5-1" progression on the organ. For example, in the key of C major, the progression would still consist of some kind of D chord (almost always minor) going to a G chord, finally ending at a C chord. While this doesn't change on the organ, how you play each particular chord will differ from the piano.
 
I would argue that  if you understand the way music works... how scales create chords >>> chords create progressions >>> progressions create songs --- then you already have a head-start when it comes to picking up a new instrument (...even guitar).
 
Don't get me wrong... there are some differences:
 
 
One major difference between the piano/keyboard and organ is what I call the "third element." You're now managing a foot pedal along with both your left and right hands.
 
Right off the bat, it requires more coordination. Then... there's the "don't lift your fingers" rule and the "slide" technique to make your chords sound smooth. Of course, you have to know how to operate the organ (the drawbars, settings, switches, percussions, etc.).
 
With all of this aside, what it all amounts to is the foot and left hand, in my opinion.
 
In gospel music, most of us are familiar with playing chords on the right hand. If you play with a band, then you're probably already accustomed to splitting up your chords into two hands with both your left and right hands constantly at work.
 
If you're solo, then you've probably grown to play bass patterns (or power chords) on your left with full chords on your right.
 
The organ changes all of this because it gives you a "bass player" (so to speak) --- YOUR FOOT!
 
 
The good thing about this is that it frees your left hand up to do many things.
 
==> For example, you can play chords on your left and solo with scales, modes, and "licks" on your right hand.
 
==> You can play a huge chord by starting it on your left and ending it on your right.
 
==> You can take what you are playing on your right hand and play a variation of it on the left hand making your chord sound full!
 
==> You can play the same "lick" on your left and right hands while walking the bass on your foot.
 
... and the list goes on.
 
 
So on that note, I want to give you some of the same chord progressions you'll be learning in GospelKeys 450 - Worship Chords & Voicings!" I warn you... the chords taught in 450 aren't for the pure beginner.
 
 
Note: You will hear a piano sound on the midi files that accompany these written examples. However, these chords sound best when played on the organ with a foot pedal, left hand, and right hand (exactly as shown).
 
 
Example Chord Progression #1
 
First, I'll give you a 2-5-1 progression.
 
"2-5-1" progressions are very popular and commonly used to end a song or to wrap a verse back around to the beginning.
 
They are called 2-5-1's because each number represents a tone of the major scale you're playing in.
 
C major:
 
C D E F G A B C
 
C=1
D=2
E=3
F=4
G=5
A=6
B=7
C = 8  (or basically "1" again).
 
 
In the key of C major, the 2nd degree of the scale is D. Likewise, the 5th degree is G and if you're catching on, the 1st degree is C itself.
 
So basically any chord based on D (usually minor) going to any 5... then back home to the 1st tone would constitute a "2-5-1" progression.
 
On the organ, this is no different.
 
 
Since there are 12 major scales, there are 12 major keys a chord progression could possibly be in.
 
In GospelKeys 450, we're in the key of Db major.
 
Therefore, our numbers would come from the Db major scale:
 
Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db
 
Db = 1
Eb = 2
F = 3
Gb = 4
Ab = 5
Bb = 6
C = 7
Db = 8  (or basically "1" again).
 
 
Now for the chord progression:
 
Ebmin11 (pronounced "E flat minor eleventh")
 
Left hand: Db F Ab Bb
Right hand: Db F Ab
Bass pedal: Eb
 
 
Ab13 (b9)
 
Left hand: C Gb
Right hand: C F A C
Bass pedal: Ab

 
Db 9/6
 
Left hand: F Bb
Right hand: Eb Ab Db
Bass pedal: Db
 
Midi file example (must be logged in):
http://zone.hearandplay.com/soundexample1
 
*With a program like Van Basco's Karaoke ( http://www.vanbasco.com ), you can load these midi file examples and it will show you exactly what notes are being played.

Need help? Visit our message board at http://www.hearandplay.com/board

 

Example Chord Progression #2
 
This next set of chords is also a "2-5-1" chord progression.
 
Ebmin11 (voiced differently)
 
Left hand: Gb Ab Bb
Right hand: Db F Ab
Bass pedal: Eb
 
 
Ab13 (b9)

Left hand: Eb Gb A C
Right hand: F A C
Bass pedal: Ab
 
 
Db 9/6
 
Left hand: F Ab Bb C
Right hand: Eb Ab C
Bass pedal: Db
 
 
 
Midi file example (must be logged in):
http://zone.hearandplay.com/soundexample2
 
*With a program like Van Basco's Karaoke ( http://www.vanbasco.com ), you can load these midi file examples and it will show you exactly what notes are being played.
 

 

Example Chord Progression #3
 
Now, we'll change things up a little bit and learn examples of the "7-3-6" progression. In GospelKeys 450, you'll learn how to apply these progressions in real-life songs. For now, I'll introduce them just so that you can get an idea of how chords are voiced on the organ.
 
 
Similar to the 2-5-1 progression, the numbers come from the major scale that you're playing in.
 
In our case, it's Db major:
 
Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db
 
Db = 1
Eb = 2
F = 3
Gb = 4
Ab = 5
Bb = 6
C = 7
Db = 8  (or basically "1" again).
 
 
So in the key of Db major, a 7-3-6 progression would be some kind of C chord going to an F chord... then resting on a Bb chord. Let's check out an example:
 
C7 (#9#5)
 
Left hand: E Bb
Right hand: Eb Ab C
Bass pedal: C
 
F7 (#9#5)
 
Left hand: Eb A Db
Right hand: F Ab Db
Bass pedal: F
 

Bbmin9
 
Left hand: Db F Ab C
Right hand: Eb Ab C
Bass pedal: Bb
 
Midi file example (must be logged in):
http://zone.hearandplay.com/soundexample3
 
*With a program like Van Basco's Karaoke ( http://www.vanbasco.com ), you can load these midi file examples and it will show you exactly what notes are being played.
 
 
Example Chord Progression #4
 
Here's another version of the 7-3-6 progression:
 
 
C7 (#9b5)
Left hand: C E
Right hand: Bb Eb Gb
Bass pedal: C
 
F13
Left hand: Eb G
Right hand: Bb D F
Bass pedal: F
 
Bbmaj9 (add 6)
Left hand: D F G
Right hand: A C D F
Bass pedal: Bb
 
Midi file example (must be logged in):
http://zone.hearandplay.com/soundexample4
 
*With a program like Van Basco's Karaoke ( http://www.vanbasco.com ), you can load these midi file examples and it will show you exactly what notes are being played.
 
 
 
Example Chord Progression #5
 
My last example has the same purpose as the previous two progressions (...that is, to get you to the 6th degree of the scale). However, instead of using conventional ways to get there like the 7-3-6, it uses the #4 and #5 ("sharped fourth and sharped fifth") to get to the 6th degree.
 
Bass pattern: G >>>  A  >>> Bb
 
G7 / 6 (#5)
Left hand: F B Eb
Right hand: F B E
Bass pedal: G
 
Amin7 (#5)
Left hand: G C F
Right hand: G C F
Bass pedal: A
 
Bbmin11
Left hand: Ab C Db F
Right hand: Ab C Eb
Bass pedal: Bb
 
 
Midi file example (must be logged in):
http://zone.hearandplay.com/soundexample5
 
 
 
Conclusion:
 
I hope you enjoyed these worship chord voicings for the organ.  As you can see, these aren't basic chords and may take some time to get used to. However, once you learn the secrets to how these fancy worship chords are constructed, you're playing will never be the same.
 
If you were intrigued by the lesson above, I invite you to check out http://www.hearandplay.com/organ for more information on GospelKeys 350 and GospelKeys 450.
 
Until next time!
 
 
Explore these chord types to prepare for future newsletters:

 

Well, I hope you enjoyed this newsletter and I'll be back soon! Take care!


This concludes your Online Classroom Lesson
 
If you were intrigued by the online classroom lesson above,
then you would definitely benefit from my course!
 
 
 

 
Enjoy this edition? Visit our message board and let us know!
http://www.hearandplay.com/board
 
Please Let a friend know about HearandPlay.com! PLEASE FORWARD
THIS NEWSLETTER TO YOUR ENTIRE E-MAIL ADDRESS BOOK.
 
 
Announcement: Have you benefited from HearandPlay.com (our lessons, courses, dvds, community)? Please visit http://www.hearandplay.com/yourstory to tell us your story and we'll include you on various areas of our website!

 
 
Yours Truly,
Jermaine Griggs
www.HearandPlay.com
www.GospelKeys.com
 
 

Further References

"The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear" 300-pg Course

[5] Chords & Progressions: pgs 65-78, 105-130, 147-165, 182-227.

Do you know what a2-5-1” or "3-6-2-5-1" progression is? Or perhaps the famous 12-bar blues chord progression? In this piano course, you will not only learn how to play gospel, blues, and jazz progressions, but how to recognize them in songs. In addition, you will learn the simple techniques to playing these progressions, hymns, and songs in all 12 major keys! ... Enjoy learning:

The famous "2-5-1" Chord Progression: pgs 114-120, 153-156, 208, 235-236.

I - IV - I - V - I Chord Progressions: pgs 66-70.

I - IV - V - IV - I Chord Progressions: pgs 77-78.

Techniques behind the famous "5-->1" progression: pgs 68-72.

I --> IV,  I --> V Chord Progressions: pgs 74-75.

"Circle of Fifths" Chord Exercises: pg 78.

Major and Minor Chord Progressions: pgs 105-130.

"6 - 2 - 5 - 1" Chord Progressions: pgs 121-122, 157-159.

"3 - 6 - 2 - 5 - 1" Chord Progressions: pgs 122-123, 160-162.

"7 - 3 - 6 - 2 - 5 - 1" Chord Progressions: pgs 124-125, 190-191.

Gospel Chord Progressions ... ranging from "up-tempo praise" chord Progressions to "worship-oriented" chord progressions: pgs 65-78, 105-130, 147-165, 182-227.

Various Blues Progressions ... 12-bar, seventh chords, diminished chords ... and others: pgs 163-165, 192.

Jazz Chord Progressions ... using dominant ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords: pgs 193-240

Study the different types of Root Progressions --- closing, opening, circular and other types of progressions: pgs 121-122.

Study how chord tones and scale degrees relate to each other [which chord progressions are most likely to be compatible]: pgs 122-130.

Learn various "turn-around" progressions [used in gospel music]: pg 213-214.

If you don't have the 300-pg Course, click here to read more about it.

 

 
"The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear" 300pg Course - Learn the secrets to playing literally any song on the piano with a few simple, "easy-to-understand" techniques and principles! Join Jermaine Griggs in learning tons of music theory, concepts, and tricks that will help you to learn piano by ear! Thousands of musicians have already taken advantage of this excellent program ... why not you?

"The Secrets to Playing Piano By Ear" is full of easy-to-understand tricks, tips, techniques and secrets to playing piano by ear! For this month only, I've also been able to throw in a few bonus items (3 additional piano software programs). Click here to learn the secrets to playing absolutely any song on the piano in virtually minutes! You won't regret it!


http://www.hearandplay.com/gk350.jpg

http://www.hearandplay.com/gk450.jpg

 

 
 

Newsletter Archive - Click here or visit http://www.hearandplay.com/newsletters.html

 
 
Announcement: Have you benefited from HearandPlay.com (our lessons, courses, dvds, community)? Please visit http://www.hearandplay.com/yourstory to tell us your story and we'll include you on various areas of our website!